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How to Paint Like Monet

David Lloyd Glover

Blog #497 of 578

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August 17th, 2013 - 04:40 PM

How to Paint Like Monet

My artist colleagues often will say they wished they do Monet style impressionist paintings. And they want me to show them how. In a new book I am authoring for Walter Foster Books I do some demonstrations on how to do a Monet painting. Of course you will never be like the master nor should you try but it is a lot of fun and gratifying as an artist to create a scene that has a bit of the look. Here is an example of a painting that I created as an homage to the great impressionist. THE SHELTERED PATH is a painting from the same area that Claude Monet himself painted. So I am able to work with a similar inspiration. Monet was more interested in the effects of light on form than he was with specific details in a painting. His work was indeed impressions of what he saw in nature and not studio slick paintings that were slaves to conventional methods of working. Paintings of the day were learned techniques using natural ground pigments with heavy leaning to the browns and grey tones that were generally accepted in the salon system. Monet saw the briliance of the ambient sunlight and how colors would change dramatically as the day progressed. Green fields were not necessarily painted green, rather they were created with a wide spectrum of colors. What you saw in the painting would feel green to your sensibiliites but look a bit deeper into the scene and you would be surprised by the colors he used. More to come on the subject.

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