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1691 Sanson Map Of The World On Hemisphere Projection

Paul Fearn

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1691 Sanson Map Of The World On Hemisphere Projection Photograph  - 1691 Sanson Map Of The World On Hemisphere Projection Fine Art Print
 

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Tags: : an extraordinary map of monumental proportions photographs, this sanson and jaillot's c.1691 decorative map of the world on a double hemisphere projection. covers the entire world according to its 17th century conception. elaborate allegorical cartouches appear at top center and bottom center detailing cherubs riding dolphins - the symbols of the dauphin of france. our survey of this map will begin in north america where california is depicted as an island. the idea of an insular california first appeared as a work of fiction in garci rodriguez de montalvo's c. 1510 romance las sergas de esplandian photographs, where he writes know photographs, that on the right hand of the indies there is an island called california very close to the side of the terrestrial paradise; and it is peopled by black women photographs, without any man among them photographs, : an extraordinary map of monumental proportions canvas prints, this sanson and jaillot's c.1691 decorative map of the world on a double hemisphere projection. covers the entire world according to its 17th century conception. elaborate allegorical cartouches appear at top center and bottom center detailing cherubs riding dolphins - the symbols of the dauphin of france. our survey of this map will begin in north america where california is depicted as an island. the idea of an insular california first appeared as a work of fiction in garci rodriguez de montalvo's c. 1510 romance las sergas de esplandian canvas prints, where he writes know canvas prints, that on the right hand of the indies there is an island called california very close to the side of the terrestrial paradise; and it is peopled by black women canvas prints, without any man among them canvas prints

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Title

1691 Sanson Map Of The World On Hemisphere Projection

Artist

Paul Fearn

Medium

Photograph

Description

: An extraordinary map of monumental proportions, this Sanson and Jaillot's c.1691 decorative map of the world on a double hemisphere projection. Covers the entire world according to its 17th century conception. Elaborate allegorical cartouches appear at top center and bottom center detailing cherubs riding dolphins - the symbols of the Dauphin of France. Our survey of this map will begin in North America where California is depicted as an island. The idea of an insular California first appeared as a work of fiction in Garci Rodriguez de Montalvo's c. 1510 romance Las Sergas de Esplandian , where he writes Know, that on the right hand of the Indies there is an island called California very close to the side of the Terrestrial Paradise; and it is peopled by black women, without any man among them, for they live in the manner of Amazons. Baja California was subsequently discovered in 1533 by Fortun Ximenez, who had been sent to the area by Hernan Cortez. When Cortez himself traveled to Baja, he must have had Montalvo's novel in mind, for he immediately claimed the Island of California for the King. By the late 16th and early 17th century ample evidence had been amassed, through explorations of the region by Francisco de Ulloa, Hernando de Alarcon and others, that California was in fact a peninsula. However, by this time other factors were in play. Francis Drake had sailed north and claimed New Albion near modern day Washington or Vancouver for England. The Spanish thus needed to promote Cortez's claim on the Island of California to preempt English claims on the western coast of North America. The significant influence of the Spanish crown on European cartographers caused a major resurgence of the Insular California theory, of which Sanson was a primary proponent. Shortly after this map was made Eusebio Kino, a Jesuit missionary, traveled overland from Mexico to California, proving conclusively the peninsularity of California. Traveling northwest, away from the mainland, we come across a land labeled Terre de Jesso or Je Co. or Terre de la Compagnie. Though Yesso or Jesso is a name usually associated with Hokkaido (which here is drawn as part of mainland Asia), this land mass is more commonly called Gama or Gamaland. Gama was supposedly discovered in the 17th century by a mysterious figure known as Jean de Gama. Various subsequent navigators claim to have seen this land and it appeared in numerous maps well into the late 18th century. At times it was associated with Hokkaido, in Japan, and at other times with the mainland of North America. On this map we are struck by its uncanny resemblance to Gerhard Muller's peninsula which emerged in the late 18th century. Based on numerous sightings but no significant exploration of the Aleutian Islands, Muller postulated that the archipelago was in fact a single land mass. This he mapped extending from the North American mainland towards Asia much as the Terre de Compagnie does on this map. It is not inconceivable that navigators sailing in the northern seas from Asia could have made this same error in the 16th and 17th centuries. Moving east of California into the North American mainland we find ourselves in the Spanish colony of New Mexico. Santa Fe, its capital, had been founded in 1610 and here we find it situated far to the north of its actual location, on the Colorado (Rio Norte) rather than the Rio Grande or Santa Fe River. It also appears near a gigantic and mysterious lake named Apache. The Apache Lake is drawn as the source of the Rio Norte or Colorado River. Though the origins of this lake are somewhat mysterious, they may be associated with Native American reports of the Great Salt Lake or another lake in the region brought back by the Onate and Coronado expeditions. In the eastern part of New Mexico territory we come across the land of Quivira.

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: an extraordinary map of monumental proportions framed prints, this sanson and jaillot's c.1691 decorative map of the world on a double hemisphere projection. covers the entire world according to its 17th century conception. elaborate allegorical cartouches appear at top center and bottom center detailing cherubs riding dolphins - the symbols of the dauphin of france. our survey of this map will begin in north america where california is depicted as an island. the idea of an insular california first appeared as a work of fiction in garci rodriguez de montalvo's c. 1510 romance las sergas de esplandian framed prints, where he writes know framed prints, that on the right hand of the indies there is an island called california very close to the side of the terrestrial paradise; and it is peopled by black women framed prints, without any man among them framed prints, for they live in the manner of amazons. baja california was subsequently discovered in 1533 by fortun ximenez framed prints, who had been sent to the area by hernan cortez. when cortez himself traveled to baja framed prints, he must have had montalvo's novel in mind framed prints, for he immediately claimed the island of california for the king. by the late 16th and early 17th century ample evidence had been amassed framed prints, through explorations of the region by francisco de ulloa framed prints, hernando de alarcon and others framed prints, that california was in fact a peninsula. however framed prints, by this time other factors were in play. francis drake had sailed north and claimed new albion near modern day washington or vancouver for england. the spanish thus needed to promote cortez's claim on the island of california to preempt english claims on the western coast of north america. the significant influence of the spanish crown on european cartographers caused a major resurgence of the insular california theory framed prints, of which sanson was a primary proponent. shortly after this map was made eusebio kino framed prints, a jesuit missionary framed prints, traveled overland from mexico to california framed prints, proving conclusively the peninsularity of california. traveling northwest framed prints, away from the mainland framed prints, we come across a land labeled terre de jesso or je co. or terre de la compagnie. though yesso or jesso is a name usually associated with hokkaido (which here is drawn as part of mainland asia) framed prints, this land mass is more commonly called gama or gamaland. gama was supposedly discovered in the 17th century by a mysterious figure known as jean de gama. various subsequent navigators claim to have seen this land and it appeared in numerous maps well into the late 18th century. at times it was associated with hokkaido framed prints, in japan framed prints, and at other times with the mainland of north america. on this map we are struck by its uncanny resemblance to gerhard muller's peninsula which emerged in the late 18th century. based on numerous sightings but no significant exploration of the aleutian islands framed prints, muller postulated that the archipelago was in fact a single land mass. this he mapped extending from the north american mainland towards asia much as the terre de compagnie does on this map. it is not inconceivable that navigators sailing in the northern seas from asia could have made this same error in the 16th and 17th centuries. moving east of california into the north american mainland we find ourselves in the spanish colony of new mexico. santa fe framed prints, its capital framed prints, had been founded in 1610 and here we find it situated far to the north of its actual location framed prints, : an extraordinary map of monumental proportions greeting cards, this sanson and jaillot's c.1691 decorative map of the world on a double hemisphere projection. covers the entire world according to its 17th century conception. elaborate allegorical cartouches appear at top center and bottom center detailing cherubs riding dolphins - the symbols of the dauphin of france. our survey of this map will begin in north america where california is depicted as an island. the idea of an insular california first appeared as a work of fiction in garci rodriguez de montalvo's c. 1510 romance las sergas de esplandian greeting cards, where he writes know greeting cards, that on the right hand of the indies there is an island called california very close to the side of the terrestrial paradise; and it is peopled by black women greeting cards, without any man among them greeting cards, for they live in the manner of amazons. baja california was subsequently discovered in 1533 by fortun ximenez greeting cards, who had been sent to the area by hernan cortez. when cortez himself traveled to baja greeting cards, he must have had montalvo's novel in mind greeting cards, for he immediately claimed the island of california for the king. by the late 16th and early 17th century ample evidence had been amassed greeting cards, through explorations of the region by francisco de ulloa greeting cards, hernando de alarcon and others greeting cards, that california was in fact a peninsula. however greeting cards, by this time other factors were in play. francis drake had sailed north and claimed new albion near modern day washington or vancouver for england. the spanish thus needed to promote cortez's claim on the island of california to preempt english claims on the western coast of north america. the significant influence of the spanish crown on european cartographers caused a major resurgence of the insular california theory greeting cards, of which sanson was a primary proponent. shortly after this map was made eusebio kino greeting cards, a jesuit missionary greeting cards, traveled overland from mexico to california greeting cards, proving conclusively the peninsularity of california. traveling northwest greeting cards, away from the mainland greeting cards, we come across a land labeled terre de jesso or je co. or terre de la compagnie. though yesso or jesso is a name usually associated with hokkaido (which here is drawn as part of mainland asia) greeting cards, this land mass is more commonly called gama or gamaland. gama was supposedly discovered in the 17th century by a mysterious figure known as jean de gama. various subsequent navigators claim to have seen this land and it appeared in numerous maps well into the late 18th century. at times it was associated with hokkaido greeting cards, in japan greeting cards, and at other times with the mainland of north america. on this map we are struck by its uncanny resemblance to gerhard muller's peninsula which emerged in the late 18th century. based on numerous sightings but no significant exploration of the aleutian islands greeting cards, muller postulated that the archipelago was in fact a single land mass. this he mapped extending from the north american mainland towards asia much as the terre de compagnie does on this map. it is not inconceivable that navigators sailing in the northern seas from asia could have made this same error in the 16th and 17th centuries. moving east of california into the north american mainland we find ourselves in the spanish colony of new mexico. santa fe greeting cards, its capital greeting cards, had been founded in 1610 and here we find it situated far to the north of its actual location greeting cards, : an extraordinary map of monumental proportions prints, this sanson and jaillot's c.1691 decorative map of the world on a double hemisphere projection. covers the entire world according to its 17th century conception. elaborate allegorical cartouches appear at top center and bottom center detailing cherubs riding dolphins - the symbols of the dauphin of france. our survey of this map will begin in north america where california is depicted as an island. the idea of an insular california first appeared as a work of fiction in garci rodriguez de montalvo's c. 1510 romance las sergas de esplandian prints, where he writes know prints, that on the right hand of the indies there is an island called california very close to the side of the terrestrial paradise; and it is peopled by black women prints, without any man among them prints, for they live in the manner of amazons. baja california was subsequently discovered in 1533 by fortun ximenez prints, who had been sent to the area by hernan cortez. when cortez himself traveled to baja prints, he must have had montalvo's novel in mind prints, for he immediately claimed the island of california for the king. by the late 16th and early 17th century ample evidence had been amassed prints, through explorations of the region by francisco de ulloa prints, hernando de alarcon and others prints, that california was in fact a peninsula. however prints, by this time other factors were in play. francis drake had sailed north and claimed new albion near modern day washington or vancouver for england. the spanish thus needed to promote cortez's claim on the island of california to preempt english claims on the western coast of north america. the significant influence of the spanish crown on european cartographers caused a major resurgence of the insular california theory prints, of which sanson was a primary proponent. shortly after this map was made eusebio kino prints, a jesuit missionary prints, traveled overland from mexico to california prints, proving conclusively the peninsularity of california. traveling northwest prints, away from the mainland prints, we come across a land labeled terre de jesso or je co. or terre de la compagnie. though yesso or jesso is a name usually associated with hokkaido (which here is drawn as part of mainland asia) prints, this land mass is more commonly called gama or gamaland. gama was supposedly discovered in the 17th century by a mysterious figure known as jean de gama. various subsequent navigators claim to have seen this land and it appeared in numerous maps well into the late 18th century. at times it was associated with hokkaido prints, in japan prints, and at other times with the mainland of north america. on this map we are struck by its uncanny resemblance to gerhard muller's peninsula which emerged in the late 18th century. based on numerous sightings but no significant exploration of the aleutian islands prints, muller postulated that the archipelago was in fact a single land mass. this he mapped extending from the north american mainland towards asia much as the terre de compagnie does on this map. it is not inconceivable that navigators sailing in the northern seas from asia could have made this same error in the 16th and 17th centuries. moving east of california into the north american mainland we find ourselves in the spanish colony of new mexico. santa fe prints, its capital prints, had been founded in 1610 and here we find it situated far to the north of its actual location prints, : an extraordinary map of monumental proportions posters, this sanson and jaillot's c.1691 decorative map of the world on a double hemisphere projection. covers the entire world according to its 17th century conception. elaborate allegorical cartouches appear at top center and bottom center detailing cherubs riding dolphins - the symbols of the dauphin of france. our survey of this map will begin in north america where california is depicted as an island. the idea of an insular california first appeared as a work of fiction in garci rodriguez de montalvo's c. 1510 romance las sergas de esplandian posters, where he writes know posters, that on the right hand of the indies there is an island called california very close to the side of the terrestrial paradise; and it is peopled by black women posters, without any man among them posters, for they live in the manner of amazons. baja california was subsequently discovered in 1533 by fortun ximenez posters, who had been sent to the area by hernan cortez. when cortez himself traveled to baja posters, he must have had montalvo's novel in mind posters, for he immediately claimed the island of california for the king. by the late 16th and early 17th century ample evidence had been amassed posters, through explorations of the region by francisco de ulloa posters, hernando de alarcon and others posters, that california was in fact a peninsula. however posters, by this time other factors were in play. francis drake had sailed north and claimed new albion near modern day washington or vancouver for england. the spanish thus needed to promote cortez's claim on the island of california to preempt english claims on the western coast of north america. the significant influence of the spanish crown on european cartographers caused a major resurgence of the insular california theory posters, of which sanson was a primary proponent. shortly after this map was made eusebio kino posters, a jesuit missionary posters, traveled overland from mexico to california posters, proving conclusively the peninsularity of california. traveling northwest posters, away from the mainland posters, we come across a land labeled terre de jesso or je co. or terre de la compagnie. though yesso or jesso is a name usually associated with hokkaido (which here is drawn as part of mainland asia) posters, this land mass is more commonly called gama or gamaland. gama was supposedly discovered in the 17th century by a mysterious figure known as jean de gama. various subsequent navigators claim to have seen this land and it appeared in numerous maps well into the late 18th century. at times it was associated with hokkaido posters, in japan posters, and at other times with the mainland of north america. on this map we are struck by its uncanny resemblance to gerhard muller's peninsula which emerged in the late 18th century. based on numerous sightings but no significant exploration of the aleutian islands posters, muller postulated that the archipelago was in fact a single land mass. this he mapped extending from the north american mainland towards asia much as the terre de compagnie does on this map. it is not inconceivable that navigators sailing in the northern seas from asia could have made this same error in the 16th and 17th centuries. moving east of california into the north american mainland we find ourselves in the spanish colony of new mexico. santa fe posters, its capital posters, had been founded in 1610 and here we find it situated far to the north of its actual location posters

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