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Packing An Original Painting

Posted by: Amy Scholten on 06/17/2013 - 10:45 PM

Today I sold an original painting (yaaayy!!!) and need to pack and ship it. I feel like a bit of a dunce for asking, but does anyone have advice on the best and most efficient way to pack it so that it won't get damaged? It's a small acrylic painting on canvas paper, so it could easily be bent or damaged. I'm not so experienced in this! Thanks for any advice!

 

Oldest Reply

Posted by: Isabella F Abbie Shores on 06/18/2013 - 4:37 AM

Congratulations.

Someone should be along soon to help you

 

Posted by: Alfred Ng on 06/18/2013 - 8:33 AM

first wrap your painting with bubble warp then put it in a sturdy cardboard box, that should do it.

 

Posted by: Andre Pillay on 06/18/2013 - 8:37 AM

Safest way to pack for shipping is to build a wooden crate.

 

Posted by: Alfred Ng on 06/18/2013 - 8:39 AM

Andre, she said, it is a small acrylic painting on canvas board,

 

Posted by: Andre Pillay on 06/18/2013 - 8:44 AM

Still , a small wooden crate/box

Like a gift box .

 

Posted by: Roy Erickson on 06/18/2013 - 10:44 AM

Be very careful about what you put next to the paint - plastic - even bubble wrap can adhere - if it's totally, completely dry - I might try a sheet of parchment cooking paper between the painting and bubble. - then a sturdy cardboard box.

 

Posted by: Phyllis Wolf on 06/18/2013 - 11:26 AM

I recently shipped a 22 x 28 stretched & wrapped canvas oil painting to Manhattan ( I'm in Texas ). I first wrapped the painting with brown craft paper and taped it with masking tape. Then I wrapped a couple of layers of bubble wrap over that, with some additional on the corners. Then I added a layer of foam board on each side. I couldn't find a box of the right dimensions so I took two boxes and cut them and folded sides. I taped all seams well with shipping tape. It arrived in New York undamaged.

By the way....you can save money on the brown kraft paper ( which is fairly thick and doesn't harm the painting or stick to it ) ...by buying a roll at a home improvement store. I bought an inexpensive roll of what they call "contractors paper" at Lowes that is 35 in. x 140 ft.! So it's a lot of paper for the money and is the same kind of brown kraft paper you would buy at an art supply store, office supply store or shipping store......the only difference really is you get far more paper for less cost!

 

Posted by: John Lyes on 06/18/2013 - 11:43 AM

Hobby Lobby and Michaels will give you free canvas boxes from the back room if you ask

 

Posted by: Phyllis Wolf on 06/18/2013 - 12:34 PM

Thanks for the tip, John! I'll ask if they have any boxes next time I'm in the next town over where HL and Michaels is.

 

Posted by: Ann Powell on 06/18/2013 - 3:37 PM

That is an important tip about not putting plastic next to the paint surface. Especially during hot weather if the package is in the heat or sun during shipping the acrylic can soften a bit if is not very old. I have used Freezer Paper, available in grocery stores, for smaller artworks. Put the slick side next to the paint surface before wrapping with bubble wrap. Making a sandwich of foam core board is a great additional protection. Thanks for the tip about contractors paper at home improvement stores, I will also check that out. !!

 

Posted by: Loretta Luglio on 06/18/2013 - 4:29 PM

Wrap in brown craft paper first. Then bubble wrap. I ship in used frame boxes.

 

Posted by: Amy Scholten on 06/18/2013 - 10:38 PM

Thank you all for your suggestions. :) Thanks also for warning me about putting plastic/ bubble wrap against the paint surface. Intuitively, I sort of knew that, but it was good to hear it here. I also called an arts and craft store in town and talked to someone in the framing department who told me "Just put it in bubble wrap." She said that's all they use - nothing between the painting and the wrap. Really? I'd rather be safe than sorry!

 

This discussion is closed.