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Lynn Palmer

11 Months Ago

Plant Identification -- A Little Help Please.

Hi all, I need a little help identifying the plants in the photos below.

What type of berry/plant in the first photo and what type of wild flower is the butterfly clinging to? Both these plants were photographed Sunday on Payne's Prairie, a north central Florida wetland.

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Gregory Scott

11 Months Ago

The first is poke berries.

 

Lynn Palmer

11 Months Ago

Thanks Gregory, too bad they aren't edible.

 

Jeffery Johnson

11 Months Ago

Birds like them and when the plant is young and if cooked correctly there is nothing like some good ole poke salad and scrambled eggs. Warning though if not cooked correctly the plant can be toxic.

 

Lynn Palmer

11 Months Ago

Sounds good Jeffery! But I won't be cooking them.

 

Bradford Martin

11 Months Ago

That's a Gulf Fritillary . I always think of the song Poke Salad Annie when I see Pokeweed.

http://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/weedguide/singlerecord.asp?id=270

 

Lynn Palmer

11 Months Ago

Yes it is Bradford, aka Passion Butterfly according to Wiki. I liked the sound of Passion butterfly better so I put Fritillary in the tags.

 

Billy Griffis Jr

11 Months Ago

Poke Weed, or Poke Salad.

We have the Gulf Fritillary and Variegated here. Gulf is probably the most common butterfly of them all around this part of the country.

If I remember correctly, that plant has to be picked young, soaked in water and boiled about 3 times to make it edible...I think I'll pass..there are too many plants you can simply pick and eat...like Chickweed, Dill, Peppergrass, Cat Tails, Dandelions...

 

Gregory Scott

11 Months Ago

I once identified some wild mushrooms as edible, except that they are toxic when consumed with alcohol. My Dad made me throw them out. He said he would consider them toxic.

 

Billy Griffis Jr

11 Months Ago

I'll eat very few wild mushrooms, too easy to confuse them. The one they sell in grocery stores has a wild cousin (Agaricus Campestris) that's super easy, and one of my favorites. Puffballs are also very easy, if a puffball is white inside and doesn't stink, it's edible. And that's exactly what my mushroom ID book says about them. A couple are purple or green inside and a couple smell awful...one is basically edible but so small it's not worth fooling with. But the softball sized brown ones are excellent...peel off the leathery skin, slice it up and drop it in some hot butter...oh yeah...

http://www.fcps.edu/islandcreekes/ecology/meadow_mushroom.htm

puffballs

http://www.mssf.org/cookbook/puffballs.html

http://www.und.nodak.edu/org/ndwild/puff.html

 

Bellesouth Studio

11 Months Ago

the first plant is also nicknamed Beautyberry. A lot of people crush them and use them to dye fabrics,etc. When our dogs get around them and brush into them, they have purple areas on their white fur!

 

Bradford Martin

11 Months Ago

I didn't know Gulf Fritillaries were called Passion butterflies so I will add that to my keywords accordingly. I noticed that the image is not showing up in a search for "pokeweed". I am not sure if you noticed that I suggested that. That is what we mostly call them locally. I also put in a link so that you could learn more. In that link you will find other names.
"Other Names: Phytolacca decandra, American cancer, American nightshade, American spinach, bear's grape, cancer-root, coakum, garget, inkberry, inkweed, pigeonberry, poke, pokeberry, pokeroot, pokeweed, red-ink plant, skoke berry, Virginia poke. "
Use em or not. I would also put in "Poke Weed" if you haven't already.

 

John Crothers

11 Months Ago

"when the plant is young and if cooked correctly there is nothing like some good ole poke salad and scrambled eggs. Warning though if not cooked correctly the plant can be toxic"

I always think about the poor people that originally made this discovery. Like that puffer fish they use that must be cleaned by a trained professional or it will kill you...quick!

Which came first? Cooking it the right way and then the next time doing it wrong and getting sick or dying or someone died and someone else said "maybe if we try cooking it a different way".

 

Bradford Martin

11 Months Ago

John all you have to do is get the tender young leaves and they won't kill you. Make sure they are very tender and young. Yum Yum so good.

 

John Crothers

11 Months Ago

Someone had to figure that out Bradford.

They started eating the young leaves and later in the year discovered those same leaves made them sick when they ate them.

I am glad OTHER people figured out this stuff for us.


Another thing...lobster.

Who was the first person to look at one of those things and think "that looks good"!

 

Bellesouth Studio

11 Months Ago

or oysters..........

 

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