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Marlene Burns

1 Year Ago

Genealogy

Anybody into it and if so, do share your success....
I have worked on and off for over 30 years...it was so much harder before the internet and the Mormon documents available.
Two of my retired cousins have gone full time...I love every story and LIFE that comes alive when a new document is uncovered....
Please share your stories AND any good website sources ;)

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Mike Savad

1 Year Ago

i've only used the free bits and a family tree my grandmother made to match up photos she had of the family that dated back to about 1890 something. i've been able to identify most of them, guessing at ages based off of facial features. but i can only get so much. until one day i ran into myself, or just a weird coincidence. where there was a michael savad, back in the 1860's. no the weird part is, i made up a name with a date that corresponded to that - Michael Thadeus Savad - my avatar, which i gave a date of 1868 i think. so maybe i channeled that.


---Mike Savad

 

Lenora De Lude

1 Year Ago

Well, I was always curious about the family of my grandfather, who died when my father was small. His name never returned any results on the net. One day, I yet again typed his full name--I'll call him James--and up came a site that traced us all the way to England through his mother, to people born in the 1400's. It even had pictures of a beautiful great great aunt that was born in the 1850's, and many other pictures. And--it has a family crest. Oh, and James's dad's line has the story of his great grandfather, who was murdered, then avenged by his sons, who disappeared into what we call the neutral strip--this was around 1845.

Another site had my French connection, and traced it to France,and to Quebec. There were many interesting stories there. It seems that I owe my existence to Union soldiers who killed the first wife and twins of my great great grandfather, who later married the lady from France who was to become my great great grandmother.

And there is at least one other line that goes back to the 1600's, to Middlesex, England. There are many interesting stories to so many lines.

 

Marlene Burns

1 Year Ago

Thanks for sharing.... Love all the stories!

 

Valerie Bruno

1 Year Ago

My family has a big one on Ancestry.com. My daughter even had her DNA done and we are 100 percent British Isles. Lot of work getting the correct information. I don't like doing the research but,, like reading about the ancestors.

 

Greg Jackson

1 Year Ago

My youngest brother has been delving into our family history for quite awhile. So far he has traced our dad's side of the family arriving/settling around 1740 in what is now North Carolina. Some missing dates and people to tie things together, but occasionally he'll get tidbits of info to add to the history tree.

 

Patricia Strand

1 Year Ago

My aunt did an exhaustive search and compiled a booklet with write-ups and photos of my maternal grandfather's family, who have been here since the Revolution. Those stories are interesting and varied in an all-American Huck Finn kind of way, and I wish I could go back further. I don't have to be left wondering about my Scandinavian ancestors -- they merely came here to own land. The Finns escaping Russian taxes, and the Norwegians to prosper. Like everyone.

Marlene, how about you??

 

ILKA BOOGAARD

1 Year Ago

Love genealogy! I always thought I came from prestigious lines, unlike my husband. However I have found it is quite the other way around. All my ancestors were simple Dutch peasants while my husbands ancestors all came across the pond to America in the early 1600's and at least 4 of his 4th great grandfathers fought in the revolutionary war. I am contemplating becoming a professional genealogist, that is... unless I become rich and famous as a photographer! ;-)

 

Roger Swezey

1 Year Ago

On my father's side.. The Swezeys, Swaseys, Swayzes, all come from one John Swasey, a Welshman, who came over in 1629, settled in Salem Mass., Then. sailed in 1652 to Southhold, L.I. .

Thank Goodness, my father married my mother who's father and mother had just arrived (early 1900s) from Eastern Europe to this country. .

There's nothing like Fresh Blood!!

 

On my Father's Side~ His mother, my grandmother~comes The Shefskey's known in Memphis Tenn...Migrated from Poland and Russia...Name was Shereshefski.
My Great Grandfather and Mother were either first or second cousins....both with the last name Shefskey....but did not know they were related when they first were married....
There is a book written called "There Once was a World" by Yaffa Eliach that covered a 900 year span of a village that was completely wiped out during WWII....And that is my
Jewish Heritage and Love for My People.

Terrie

 

Theresa Tahara

1 Year Ago

I haven't done much investigating but I found lots of old pictures and this newspaper clipping from 1936 in an old box of my grandmother's. My southern neighbours might find this interesting: "Asa C. Brown, Minnesota pioneer and a veteran of the war of 1812. Had 7 sons and 5 grandsons in the Civil War and they all came back alive."
This would be a relative on my mother's side. Her maiden name was Brown.

I am mostly English, maiden name Groves and grandmother's (on my father's side) maiden name Silverthorne. I would love to research my Silverthorne relatives. The first known recording of the family name is believed to be that of Roger Selverthorn. This was dated 1327, in the Pipe Rolls of Somerset during the reign of King Edward IIIrd of England

Genealogy really facinates me but I don't have enough time to look into it.

 

FirstName LastName

1 Year Ago

I was adopted at 3 months old by the only parents I've ever known. They had tried for several years to have children and finally got me - at which time they had 2 natural born sons in 2 successive years. I worked for a Land Surveyor and did Court House research at one point. I once looked up my records, only to find that the court took me away from my natural mother for neglect and abuse. Momma says that when they got me, I only weighed 9 pounds at 3 months age. My folks have never dissuaded me from looking for my birth family, but that's a can of worms I've never opened.

My Dad says his family is 'Bohunk'. When we ask him where Bohunks are from, he says matter of factly, "Bohunkia". Oh well...

 

Marlene Burns

1 Year Ago

Great stuff!
My favorite site is ancestry.com

 

Roy Erickson

1 Year Ago

Once upon a time - about 40 years ago - I had some interest - but was met with so many 'dead ends' that I soon gave it up. It holds no interest in me any longer and what few relatives I have - don't care about it at all.

 

Jim Sauchyn

1 Year Ago

Marlene, it's my favorite hobby. I've had my dna tested and discovered a few interesting things. My maternal side is all over NW Europe, and I'm related to Oetzi the Iceman, that ancient fellow they found frozen in the Alps. Many of my NW European ancestors are actually Viking in origin since they traveled so extensively. And even on my paternal side which is Ukrainian the origins are Viking, rare but not unusual for Ukraine since the Vikings also traveled through eastern Europe. My dna has bits of just about everything - African, Native American, and vague references to various populations from all over Eurasia and the middle east - I'm sure that's from the Ukrainian half - Armenian, Turkish, Jewish, just about every east European country, Siberia, and some other central Eurasian groups but for anyone who has or is considering testing their dna it's a new science and you do get lot of 'noise' in the results which may or may not be there. I did connect with some distant cousins that way however and the match was confirmed on paper.
On my maternal side we have been in North America since the 1620's in New England (Plymouth Colony) and New France (Quebec).

 

Marlene Burns

1 Year Ago

Jim,
I was considering DNA but have had so many real documented leads that I've been busy

My dad's name showed up in my partners family tree last week. Now that was weird!

 

Marlene Burns

1 Year Ago

Wow, Roy. Thanks for sharing your success.
Mark, in our family the place was Podunk! Lol

 

Love it and know a lot about my family....most good :)

 

Marlene Burns

1 Year Ago

Funny, Abbie
We found some inbreeding between first cousins. Which sure explains a lot!

 

Conor Murphy

1 Year Ago

If there is some Irish in you, this is a good site to learn about your family, You need to know the County that they were from. Enjoy.

http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/

 

Conor Yes, a lot of my family are on that :)

 

Jim Sauchyn

1 Year Ago

Marlene, dna combined with the paper trail is the way to go. You can't always trust the paper record. Dna is expensive but fascinating.
I found my Mother's family name in the Domesday Book - essentially the first census of England n 1086. The family name is from a village in Leicestershire.
I've found a few cousins that married, also the same families showing up in different lines.

 

Marlene Burns

1 Year Ago

Jim, My paper records only go back to 1800....luckily, in our tradition, we name after a recently deceased person...the same Hebrew name...so about every other generation you will see the same names. It's easy to weed out the non-related or perhaps, just not direct line if the names have no repetitions down the line.
For example, My grandfather's name was Yehudah (judah) and his sister Masha, born born late 1890's. A long lost cousin contacted me and had the marriage license of a Yehudah and Masha Zalcberg in 1820...we researched and discovered that the married couple had a son who was the grandfather of the aforementioned siblings...and the names of that son and his siblings were repeated in our family line a few times over. When my grandfather died, 4 grandchildren carried on his name. When my grandson was born, he carried on both of his grea grandfather's name.....makes things SO much easier!!

 

Mary Bedy

1 Year Ago

I'm supposedly descended from Ethan Allen on my dad's mother's side. In fact my dad's two middle names were "Ethan Allen", but I have not plopped down the $150.00 at Ancestry to try and do a trace. Apparently, Ethan Allen had several children with his 2nd or 3rd wife - I can't remember now. I think it would be interesting. Maybe some day. I don't know how I would trace my grandfather's side back to Norway. I'm 3rd generation American on that side.

 

MM Anderson

1 Year Ago

I haven't worked much on it lately, but a few years ago I did have my and my sister's DNA tested and I managed to learn a lot about my mother's family where before I had little information. Tracing through Ancestry.com and corroborating it with DNA is a great way to go. My mother's ancestry was Colonial US, mostly England/Wales/Scotland but I've also found a bit of German way back there and my DNA also has a trace of African and Native American although I haven't tracked down that connection yet. I think most people with Colonial US ancestry are related to one degree or another. I've found distant cousins from many other former British colonies and also from Scandinavia (my father's side) I wish I had more time to devote to it now.

 

MM Anderson

1 Year Ago

Mary, the surnames make it difficult for those of us with Scandinavian ancestry to trace things, but I've had cousins contact me with information that I didn't have about my Swedish ancestors so you never know.

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Suzanne Powers

1 Year Ago

.

 

Suzanne Powers

1 Year Ago

Fascinating thread Marlene. I didn't realize Ancestry.com could be used for family research.

Mike Savad,

The name you gave yourself may have been a name mentioned in your family because of this relative but not knowing who he was, also names reoccur down the generations (if I understand you correctly). That is what happened to me when I was given my name at birth. My name had been mentioned when my Father was growing up. He always liked the name and never knew who it was or that it was an ancestor's name (my grandfather's grandmother) until a friend of mine helped me with my father's family tree.

A reason my grandfather may not have mention the name often and my father not remembering who she was because she died long before he was born, fading from my grandfather's memory. He was also gone for frequent periods of time since he was an engineer for B&O Railroad.

For two generations my father's father and grandfather married late, in their forties and fifties. My great grandfather was born in 1827 when John Quincy Adams was president.

An interesting note; the chances of my great grandfather and great grandmother ever meeting would have been remote since he was a dirt farmer from Stauntan, VA and she lived a distance up the Shenandoah Valley in Mount Jackson. I figure they met on my great grandmother's family farm on either of two occasions when Stonewall Jackson's troops camped there (Camp Buchanan), it also may have helped that her uncles and brothers were also in Stonewall's Brigade. She probably visited and helped out while the troops were there since her family members were so close by.

The first wigwag station was on her family's farm (they were Pittman) it was a mountain known during the Civil War as "Pittman Point." The signal corps of both the North and the South used it sending code down the Valley as to troop movements. The mountain changed hands many times during the war. All four of my great grandfather's brothers including my great grandfather survived the war.

Many records of ancestors from Virginia can also be found at Battle Abbey, Richmond VA, the home of the VA Historical Society, located next door to the VA Museum. I found some books there with family trees, information written about other relations and the Pittman farm that was owned by family for generations until the turn of the century. During the time it was a farm owned by the Pittmans it was also an inn where President Andrew Jackson stayed on his way to Warm Springs and a post office.

 

David Bishop

1 Year Ago

I found this on my 5th greatgrandfather Eleasar Bishop have done some research on Ancestry but this other site is free and lots of good info http://www.ourfamtree.org
Birth
1683

Channel Islands, Guernsey, Jersey
Death
3 Sep 1755

CT, New London Co, New London
Aged: 72.7 years
Tradition has it that in the year 1692, there came from the Channel Isles to New London , Connecticut, a lad named Eleazar {Eleaser} Bishop {Bischopp}. Two stories have come to us regarding his coming.
First:
The lad, Eleazer, at about the age of seven years, was playing by the shore of the Isle of Guernsey or Jersey (as both islands are mentioned in the narrative) with a large handsome dog. It was probably a seaport and he was playing near the wharf when the Captain of a British ship which had called there, saw the dog and was so determined to secure it that he sent men ashore with instructions to bring the dog aboard under any circumstances. The boy refused to be parted with his companion and so both dog and boy were brought on board the ship which was bound for America. Before the long voyage across the Atlantic had ended the ship's crew had so won the affection of the dog, that it was willing to remain on board and as the Captain had no further use for the boy, whom he had kidnapped, he determined to dispose of him at the first opportunity. Arriving at the port of New London, he was able to attain his purpose and dispose of the lad to one Richard Dart, a tailor of New London, who paid for the boy's passage by giving the captain a yoke of oxen.
Second:
Eleazer ran away from his home in the Isle of Jersey, was a stowaway on a British ship bound for America, and at the age of fourteen found himself in New London in the home of Richard Dart, who took the boy as his own and brought him up in his own family. It is recorded that two companions of Eleazer Bishop, one, Deshon, and the other, John Eharpe [Sharpe?], were brought by a British Ship to New London, Conn., and a wealthy farmer, Richard Dart, paid for young Bishop's passage as recorded above

 

Marlene Burns

1 Year Ago

Suzanna and David,
Thanks for your stories!!!

 

Mary Bedy

1 Year Ago

I just reread this thread, Marlene, and I remember my mother saying one of her uncles was one of Teddy Rosevelt's Rough Riders. I just found a roster on-line, and unfortunately, none of the last names I know of on her side of the family are in there. I would be curious who he was. Apparently he died suspiciously while "cleaning his gun" as they say....probably around 1900.

 

Jim Sauchyn

1 Year Ago

In the 1800's geneology became very popular but the trend then was to make them up and connect to royalty without really checking facts. A lot of those old family trees have been posted to the internet and a lot of people have copied and reposted them on various sites without doing research. So you have to be careful what you believe. I always try and check sources and if I can't prove a connection I don't take it as fact. I have a few lines that initially I entered into my family tree but with more research discovered them to be false.
Basically, I wouldn't trust any tree posted on any commercial geneology websites unless I had birth, marriage records etc. to substantiate them. Wills are also a good source as are census.

 

Mick Flynn

1 Year Ago

Well said Jim Sauchyn, I've had 'relatives' contact me with details of my family tree which have wild and totally wrong information... including wrong details for me! Check everything. If people say they have gone back to before about 1800 on-line without a paper trail it's very often BS and guess work.

 

Marlene Burns

1 Year Ago

amen Jim!

 

Jim Sauchyn

1 Year Ago

I have files and files full of census, bmd records etc., and I always link them to people in my family tree software. I use the PAF program from FamilySearch which is free I think, or it used to be.
Even when you have vital records like census you have to cross reference the information because ages of people for example can be off by 5 years.

 

Richard Hubal

1 Year Ago

Hey Marlene... long time. Yeah ever since this internet is coming along full force, well... guess what? I'm doing it full time. Although i do have a bit of history, it's the drive to believe in your self that "yes' i can do it. Believe in your self that is the only loyal cheerleader you'll find. Right... now i'm going to start a discussion,

 

MM Anderson

1 Year Ago

You do have to be careful about the info you find in other people's trees on Ancestry.com but since I've had my DNA done I've been able to corroborate some of the ancestral links through sharing information on the 23andMe site where I had the test done.

 

Jim Sauchyn

1 Year Ago

MM - I used Familytreedna, the majority of the matches are so far back in time they're almost irrelevant. From what I've read 23 and me and Familytreedna give slightly different results. A lot of people use both services. You can also upload your 23 and me results to FTNDA for a fee.

 

Marlene Burns

1 Year Ago

Richard! So good to see you!!
Love your 'tude...spread some of it around here, will ya?

Jim....was just at a freind's home the other night and she did dna testing thru 23 and me...and laughed that she was 2.9 neanderthal.....weren't we all?

 

Roz Abellera Art

1 Year Ago

My roots are Filipino. But my wife is a descendant of King Edward Longshanks, if you ever watched the movie Braveheart, he was the tyrannical king of England. No kidding, she had her lineage traced back.

Once in a while as a joke I like to yell "FREEEDOMMMM" just like in the movie just to tease her. LOL


-Roz Barron Abellera

 

MM Anderson

1 Year Ago

Roz, there's a thread at 23andMe about people descended from Kind Edward I. There are a lot of them. I may be one of them according to some trees I've seen but I haven't included that far back in my own tree because I don't trust the information. I think he would have been my 24th great-grandfather or something. There is also a DNA project on Gedmatch I think where people who think they are his descendants can compare DNA.

 

Jim Sauchyn

1 Year Ago

As in my previous post, geneologies in the 1800's always had some connection to royalty, it was fashionable then. Some may be valid because the rulers often had mistresses, also in the feudal system which existed then the peasants who worked for and lived on the land of a noble or earl etc., often took the surname of the earl/noble for their own.

 

Marlene Burns

1 Year Ago

never say always, Jim!
All of my family records from the 1800's are very basic, records of births, age of parents, names, time, witnesses, location etc.
Ain't no stinkin' royalty in my family! lol

 

Jim Sauchyn

1 Year Ago

My mistake Marlene, I meant some published geneologies, I have a few in my ancestry that I looked into and found out they were fabricated.
Actually, my 2nd great grandmother was a Churchill, and way back we connect to the former PM of England Sir Winston, and through that line which connects to the Spencer family I figured out I'm related to the royal family of England. The Churchills changed their surname to Spencer-Churchill at one point and then later dropped the Spencer altogether.
I also connected to the Vanderbilts and the Roosevelts because I had Dutch ancestry in new Amsterdam.

 

Marlene Burns

1 Year Ago

Hi Jim, Have to answer you here...my inter-faa e mail doesn't work.
My Dad's family was from Galicia and the jewish websites are pretty amazing....it also helps that the Mormon records are so very thorough!

 

Jim Sauchyn

1 Year Ago

What towns, my grandparents were from Ivano-Frankivsk, Rozhnyativ - towns of Perehinsko and Nebyliv. Used to be Dolyna or Kalush I forget. When it was Part of Poland and Austria it was called Stanislav. Border changes make geneology all the more interesting.

 

Marlene Burns

1 Year Ago

Mine were from Rymalov, Grymalov, ...the spelling differences are wild!

 

Jim Sauchyn

1 Year Ago

Hmm.. that's about 100 miles from where mine were from. I have the Greek Catholic church records on permanent loan at the Mormon church here. It's fairly cheap, $15 or something. So that way I found most of my grandfather's family, and in my grandmother's village the records are only available from 1835-1865 but I reached back to an ancestor b.c. 1744.
Once you know a village's name you can order films that way from the Mormon Church in Utah.

 

Marlene Burns

1 Year Ago

I go through the Mormon Church already...Ive got all I can get from their records but thank you!
Interesting story about those relatives...my dad told us that their original last name was different...that a family from their town was bringing over minor children and adopting them, givign them their own name to get them to America. I researched the story and as it turns out, there was a family doing this at the turn of the century and they did give the family name to many young men, but not my dads family. These wonderful people were bonafide relative of my Dad!
The stories get twisted, but so many facts reappear! It's like being a detective, I love it!

 

Greg DeBeck

1 Year Ago

I got bitten by the bug many years ago, as did my late wife. We were both very lucky in that for both of us, several generations of both sides of our families all lived in the central Maine area. Most of the town offices and cemeteries were all within fairly easy driving distance of where we lived, so we were able to get a wealth of information "straight from the horse's mouth" so to speak. Many trips to the Bangor public library and the Maine State Archives in Augusta helped a lot also. Ancestry.com is a wonderful source, also - takes a lot of the leg work out of traveling to obtain marriage, birth, and death records, census records, etc. - now you can do it from the comfort of your own home. A word of caution to people looking to further their family trees, tho - use the websites as starting points, but don't take ANYTHING as the gospel truth until you have copies of actual records in hand to substantiate the truth. Just because something is posted online doesn't make it true. I've found a few mistakes about my family posted online, and have tried to contact as many of the posters as possible to ask about their sources or correct their mistakes, but that can become incredibly time consuming also. I'm VERY lucky that my parents had many, many ancestral pictures dating back to the mid 1800's - really cool to be able to put a face with the name. In fact, my biggest pet peeve is when we find pictures that have no name on the back. My grandparents were able to identify many of the people in our pictures, before they died, but there are many more who we are sure were ancestors, but there is no longer anybody alive who can identify them. PLEASE write on as many pictures as possible. Even tho YOU know who is in them, 100 years from now, there may be interested descendants who won't know, and this would be a precious gift for them. Wonderful hobby, but VERY addictive lol.

 

Mary Ellen Anderson

1 Year Ago

I really do plan to give a go at painting the stories of my ancestors and history next year. So Marlene, this is a very timely thread to me. This is REALLY fun art and but also probably the most challenging too. Challenging both art wise, but if you think the current family scuttlebutt is confused wait till you re-earth the 150 year old family scandal. The greatX-aunts and uncles are still not over it, and there is little similarity between the two versions (or historic fact) - lol. So I do feel that you do need to be aware of how "airing your dirty linen" this can be. It's highly personal art. You can't forget that cute story about greatx-millie, is someone these people knew and loved.

I'm using ancestry.com. My ancestry is in Ireland, and I plan to try and do a trip and do some research. Has anyone tried this?

The addresses that you get from records always amazes me. I'm from Limerick, but there is a Limerick, city, county, parish, etc. So you'll see addresses like: Limerick, Limerick, Limerick, Limerick, peir house #3. Why am I skeptical I'll find these places - lol.

If you've got Irish ancestry you've traced than let me know. If I'm there I might as well look for others too.
-- mary ellen anderson

 

Marlene Burns

1 Year Ago

no Irish in me....all polish/russian/austrian jewry.

 

Marlene Burns

1 Year Ago

One of my most valuable finds was a group on facebook for descendants from a small town in Poland. The wealth of information people have collected is astounding!
when i first joined, up popped a picture of my great uncle who lived in buenos aires..Illived with my grandmother, his sister all her life and recognized pix of him....
Just last week, someone posted a virtual tour of the town as it is today and I saw street names of where my ancestor's lived!
The most shocking was photographs of the now defunct jewish cemetery, where the walls were constructed from the descecrated gravestones....

 

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