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Rich Franco

5 Years Ago

Copying Artwork Correctly "the Mechanics" By Rich Franco

Hello to All,

Here is a new tutorial for correctly copying artwork. This first lesson is all about the actual "mechanics" of how to set up the artwork correctly, which is the foundation for the image to be later "tweaked" in Photoshop or some other software editing program. Generally, this step is what causes problems down the line. If the artwork isn't copied correctly to start, then the quality of the image will suffer later, with "soft" spots or out of focus, which is actually out of depth of field(DOF).

Basically, this is just making sure that the front of the lens of your camera, is perfectly in line with the surface of the artwork. Any angle difference, may produce an area that appears out of focus.

So let's start!

Art Prints

Here's a diagram that I hope you can understand! No really, I'm not an very good sketcher!

A. In this drawing, I'm showing that the "middle" of the hanging art work, which in this case is 46" is the exact same middle of the lens, @ 46". This means that the camera and the artwork, are perfectly parallel to each other.
B. The math may not be right, but I'm also showing here that the artwork. looking down, is perfectly aligned to the camera body/lens. If any of those numbers are off, then the artwork isn't perfectly aligned to the camera and an area of "out of focus" could occur.
C. This shows that the artwork is at a perfect 90 degree angle, as is the front of the camera lens.
D. If you are using an easel, instead of this type of stand, then the angle of the artwork on the easel, MUST be duplicated by the angle of the camera/lens. So really, easier if kept at a 90 degree.

Here's the start-up shot. This shows the beginning process and how it looks before the artwork is hung on those "background stands".

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1. Level the hanging bar.

Art Prints

2. Level the 2 support bars, if you are using 2. I used 2 here, since the artwork was relatively high, at 24" and there was a bit of wind. These support cross members keep the artwork in a correct 90 degree and prevents the artwork from hanging at a slight angle to the back.

Photography Prints

3. Here's a shot of the artwork and the copy stand, with the support cross members, getting readied to be leveled.

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4. Now level the top of the artwork. Here, I'm on a slight slope of the driveway, so I adjusted the right side up, about an inch, to get a nice level.

Photography Prints

5.Now level the top of the camera, here I'm using the "hot shoe" which is a nice flat spot.

Photography Prints

6. I left out one photo, where I made sure that the front surface of the artwork was @ a 90 degree, which it was. So here, I'm making the front of the lens, ALSO 90 degrees.

Photography Prints

7. Find the "center" of your artwork. Mine is 24" high, so the "center" is 12", and then mark it with a piece of tape.

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8.Now, using that "center" mark, measure from the center, to the ground. In this case about 40 1/2 inches.

Photography Prints

9. Now, with that exact distance, from the ground to the center of the artwork, adjust the camera, so the "center" of the lens, is now the same, 40 1/2".

Photography Prints

Congratulations! Your artwork and your camera are now "PERFECTLY" aligned to each other. When you now take or make a copy, everything is parallel to each and will have no areas that are out of DOF or look, to be out of focus.

Here's the final tasks, prior to clicking the shutter.

9. Place a "White of Gray" card in the image. You will use this later, in Photoshop, to perfectly correct any color caste from the quality of light used to copy this artwork. That means both, full sunlight, like this example, over caste light or any man made light. If you do use the outside to copy your artwork, the best time is between 11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m., for the "cleanest light" before and after, it may be cool or too warm. ALSO, align the artwork 90 degrees towards the sun, so that you are not creating any shadows, if you art has any depth to it from the heavy paint. Important!!! REMEMBER TO REMOVE THE WHITE OR GRAY CARDS BEFORE YOU ACTUALLY TAKE THE REAL COPY PHOTO! I didn't always remember!!!

Finally, here is a sample of the gray card. In the middle, is the actual Kodak 18% gray card and then 2 paint chips. Any "white" will work and any neutral gray will work, if it's close to this 18% color/density.

Art Prints

Hope this helps and when I get a chance, will then go into the "photoshop" steps, that use the white/gray card to correct the color balance of your artwork. Or just go to Youtube or read this: http://layersmagazine.com/using-a-gray-card-for-setting-white-balance-in-adobe-photoshop-camera-raw.html

More info here too: http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/rich-franco.html?tab=artworkgalleries&artworkgalleryid=598941

If you have any questions, just post them here or email them and I'll try and answer them, or find someone that can!!!

Rich Franco

richfrancocars.com

p.s Anyone that can actually DRAW and would like to improve my little sketch, let me know!

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Barbara St Jean

5 Years Ago

I'm bumping this post up. Rich you are amazing! Putting this together, for the all artists, who struggle to get a great image of their paintings. It's very difficult to do and I want to thank you for trying to help.

I wish I lived closer to you, so I could get you to photograph my large canvases that can't be scanned, without stitching together 20 pieces or more...I still have not mastered the art of photographing them properly, but now I will be following your directions while trying to get them captured without glare, distortions or blurriness.

Thanks again,

Barbara

 

CHERYL EMERSON ADAMS

5 Years Ago

Suppose someone were to decide to buy a camera, for the sole purpose of photographing artwork for posting on FAA, and they're trying to decide whether they need to buy one, or whether they can get away with using the camera they already have.

What are the minimum specifications for the camera?

Also, Picasa has a "straighten" function. If you photograph your art crooked, you can straighten it. Can using the "straighten" function mess up the photograph?



 

Rich Franco

5 Years Ago

Barbara,

Thank You! Can you see the images??? I can't and assume nobody can yet! Let me know if you have any questions about my "tutorial" and I'll try and answer them. REALLY not hard to do, if you follow my "recipe"!

Cheryl,

IF you already own a SLR or a DSLR, then you're fine. That means that you have a pretty good sensor. The SLR, which is a film camera, has the "original" full frame size that is 35mm or 24x36mm and perfect! The DSLR, probably has a 1.6 sensor factor, for Canon and a 1.5 sensor for Nikon. Here's the image that I use to explain the sensor size,relative to a full 35mm negative or sensor:

Art Prints

The "black" rectangle is the "full frame" sensor or the 35mm film size! The red and blue are the Canon and Nikon sized APC sensors, which you can see how much smaller they are! The purple and yellow boxes are typically what most Point & Shoot cameras have!!! AND ALMOST ALL Smart phones are about a 1/4th the size of the yellow box! Yikes!!! So this gives you an idea of the potential quality of cameras and sensor sizes.

By the way, the sensor factor stuff I talked about is simply this. If you have a Canon DSLR, with a 1.6 factor APS sensor and attach a 100mm lens, what you see through the viewfinder, is what a 160mm lens would show on a full frame sensored camera! 1.6 x 100mm = 160!

This image shows a "normal" full frame lens covering the film or full frame sensor. Since lenses are round, not rectangular, there is ALWAYS image that spills over the sides of the "box". The green box and circle is the smaller APS-C sensor and lens image circle for those cameras.

Photography Prints

This image below shows what happens when you put a lens, designed for a full frame camera or DSLR, on an APS sized sensor, like a Canon Rebel, the image circle covers beyond the actual sensor and thus, appears that your lens is longer, when in reality, it's just cropped, since most of it is on the sides of the sensor!

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Did I get you totally confused yet?

If budget was a concern and you already owned an old 35mm film camera, I would suggest that you just buy a used macro lens, 100mm or a bit longer and shoot film and then send the film to a "pro" lab, get it scanned and sent back on a DVD/CD, for about $.50 for each negative scanned. I can help with the film choice and where to get it scanned,

Fingers hurt! Break time!

Rich

p.s. As far as the "straighten" function, yes, sometimes I do end up using that tool, but in order to use that tool, you need to crop in and then you loose some of the image, so when I copy artwork, I always try to crop the image very close to the sides, so I can use the full file size and not have to enlarge later, to get back to the original capture size of the camera!

 

Rich Franco

5 Years Ago

If you can't click on those small boxes, then just find my stuff on my site and go to the gallery that says "Photoshop stuff, not for sale", images are in there.

Rich

 

Rich Franco

5 Years Ago

BUMP!

Seems the site is NOW working, so the images now will show up!

Rich

 

Rich Franco

5 Years Ago

BUMP-dity-BUMP!

Images are now there!

 

CHERYL EMERSON ADAMS

5 Years Ago

My camera's not DSLR, so... that makes it pretty dicey whether I can get an image that will print. I've done it, but it was by accident not skill, wish I knew what I did.

 

Rich Franco

5 Years Ago

Cheryl,

Well, then give us a hint! Is it a P&S or a film camera? What make and model. If you did it once, you can do it again!

Rich

 

Floyd Snyder

5 Years Ago

Great information Rich!

Very nice of you to put this all together. You should write a "For Dummies" book for this and other aspects of the whole process of producing captures for Giclee printing.

 

Gary Warnimont

5 Years Ago

Rich, thank you for going through all this. All 2-d artists need to know how to do copy work,sadly many do not.
Perhaps a discussion about using the proper focal length lens,white balancing technics,light sources, tungsten electronic,flash,LED would be helpful eventually.
You have got folks going in the right direction.Most kind of you !

 

Chuck De La Rosa

5 Years Ago

Rich, though I don't have a need for this, it's an excellent write up that a lot of folks here are going benefit from. Nice work!

 

Rich Franco

5 Years Ago

Floyd, Gary, and Chuck,

Glad to share. For many of us "old codgers" this is stuff we did almost blindfolded, or maybe "impaired" in another way! LOL!

Gary, if you go to my site and then the gallery "Copying Artwork" you'll see this and a few other suggestions.

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Also, in the "description" how to make what is called "pot stands", no not some place to sell you know what, but stands from an empty gallon paint can, some cement and then a 1x2" sticking up. I had these all over my big studio, cheap and replace expensive $100+ stands to attach stuff to. If you copy art a lot AND have a place to store these, then that's the cheap way to go:

Art Prints

Also, the lights that I use, which are "soft" compact fluorescent bulbs, and some big clamp on reflectors.

Here's the link for the gallery:

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/rich-franco.html?tab=artworkgalleries&artworkgalleryid=598941

And as far as the right lens, I like a longish macro, 100mm to 180mm and shoot usually around f11, so I know I've got the depth of field covered. The advantage of a macro, is that it has a flat lens and not a curved one. Back in the day, people that copied artwork, had special lenses that were ONLY designed for copying and these had a flat piece of glass on the ends, so no curvature could possibly be created, even if up close,which a normal lens can do.

Also, the length of 100 to 180, let's you get a bit away from the art and you're not right up on top of it, so there's room to get between the art and the camera, to make adjustments and you aren't constantly moving the camera/tripod.

I'll get going on the second part of this, the computer end and how to ALWAYS get the color accurate, with the use of a Kodak Gray card or even just a white board and a single click in photoshop!

Any other suggestions for more of this stuff?

Rich

p.s. I've got a surprise coming! An artist friend has redrawn my original sketches and now, even a caveman can understand them!!! Later tonight,

 

VIVA Anderson

5 Years Ago

Thank you Rich, so much....Ms.V

 

Rich Franco

5 Years Ago

Ms. V,

My pleasure! Anything I might try and improve? A better sketch is on the way,

Rich

 

VIVA Anderson

5 Years Ago

Such a great contribution you've made, Rich. I wouldn't know of what to change, with my limited knowledge, seems complete to me, for sure. This is so important to those who sell on pod their originals..........because one can't sell a tweaked original in pod, and sell the untweaked original therefore..........so, at least now, people will have really good photos of their originals...........(me, now, I spend my creative time reinventing my originals for pod,and enjoying the transformations I achieve...........all done electronically, not in the camera....sooo, no need for a good photo, but no need for a bad photo, either, lol)

 

Rich Franco

5 Years Ago

Ms.V.,

Maybe the question should be, is there anything that I've posted that could be simpler? Or could go into more depth?

Rich

 

VIVA Anderson

5 Years Ago

Well, Rich..........nope !! ... "good on ya" in the Australian vernacular for 'mate you've done well', which is Australian vernacular too, lol...........I understand it all, so that's saying something!!!!!!!!!!!!!!.

Hope you get lots of feedback and a few 'thanks', too............Cheers.....

 

Rich Franco

5 Years Ago

Ms.V.,

Thanks for looking and helping. I really want this to be understood by newbies and also oldbies! LOL!

Rich

 

David Smith

5 Years Ago

One caveat. Unless Kodak has made a change recently, don't use a Kodak 18% gray card for color balancing. They were meant for exposure metering only and are not color neutral. I have 3 and none are neutral and they don't even match each other. There are color neutral gray cards designed for digital available.

Also, if you varnish or glaze your work, or use oils that have a gloss finish to them, buy a good polarizing filter for your lens and polarizing gels for for your lights.

 

Nancy Merkle

5 Years Ago

This looks like some great information. I'm going to follow this thread so I can take more time to digest. Thanks so much for the post.

 

Rich Franco

5 Years Ago

David,

Will check out that Kodak graycard info tomorrow. I also have there, the Macbeth Color card on my gallery, which also should have an 18% Gray.

But in reality, might be splitting hairs. Being off a point or two of color, is acceptable, considering monitors and printers.

Polarizing filters can also add a color caste, so we need to test those too. And, if a piece of artwork is lit correctly, then a filter is not needed.

I'll let you know what I find out about the gray card. Of course, a white card should solve that problem,

Rich

 

Gregory Scott

5 Years Ago

There are some problems with illuminating your art with natural light.
If you use shade, the color of shade will be dependent on the objects that are reflecting the light into the shade, such as the tree canopy, nearby building, a cloudy or sunny sky, and so on. For consistency, a good quality artificial light can produce a much more consistent light, which will allow you to choose the correct color temperature and more accurately reproduce the color of your images.

Other problems with open-air setups of this sort are wind and other weather (think sudden rainstorms, etc.).

Consistent conditions, and a more accurate setup are easiest in a studio or other room which is used for that purpose, if it is large enough to achieve the geometry you need. You'll have more need for reflectors and/or diffusers to soften the light, but common materials such as muslin can be used to good effect for such purposes.

Color balance settings, rather than color filters, are likely to be the easiest way to achieve accurate color, so an 18% grey card is the most common/standard way to do this.

 

Rich Franco

5 Years Ago

Is it me, or does everybody feel like buying some stuff........?

Rich

 

CHERYL EMERSON ADAMS

5 Years Ago

Wow, probably took a long time to type that one. Hope the spammeroid got paid for sending out all that free advertising.

********

Back to cameras... mine is a PS (point & shoot), no film, it has manual and automatic settings. Here goes: Panasonic Lumix 16x optical zoom DMCZS8. How's that for too much information...

My best skills with this camera are getting blurry images - and slightly weird (pixellated maybe?) backgrounds.

The amount of blurry I get is fine for snapshots, not ok for POD purposes - I'm having trouble getting the camera to focus properly - the camera seems to want to do it's own thing. This might not be something people can help me with online -- probably someone would have to be here to see what it is I'm not doing right.

I don't have the first clue what's causing the weird backgrounds - whether that's something I'm doing or a limitation of the camera.

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Rich Franco

5 Years Ago

Gregory,

O f course, the "IDEAL" situation is studio lighting, lights and a space dedicated to just copying artwork, which I had set up when I was doing enough of this to keep that set-up, set up! BUT for most artists, investing in a light system, learning that light system, learning HOW to light a subject, is way to expensive and complicated and really, not needed for the majority of artwork copied for FAA. If you were going to submit files for a book or something along those lines, then yes, hire a Pro and let them do it. This is for ALL the others.

As far as the quality of light, Kodak and Fuji state that depending where you live, the time from 10:00 to 2:00 pm, is the best and the closest to mid-day is the BESTEST!

Yes, wind, is worse than rain for me, since if it's going to rain, not worth the effort to set up. But if there is a bit of wind, like it was for this image that I copied outdoors, then a second person or some sand bags are in order:

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This was a very gusty day and I had my trusty assistant (wife) standing next to the artwork!

And yes, I wouldn't use any "filters" to correct any colors that I would need accurate.

 

David Smith

11 Months Ago

Ray

If the paper that you're painting on is 8 1/2 " x 11" , your best bet is to get a flatbed scanner or have them scanned. An Epson V19 would do the trick and they're about $70.

When you paint in the future, if you continue to use sketchpads, think about leaving 1/2" or a little more all around the image so that you don't get too close to the edge.

 

Philip Eddy

10 Months Ago

Thanks Rich, great info and practical application to get the task done in professional way.
Philip

 

Rich Franco

10 Months Ago

Philip,

Thank you! Let me know if you have any questions. BEST possible light, is always a bright/overcast day, between 10:00 and 3:00 and the closer to noon the better. But for our purposes, middle of the day is fine. If you HAVE to use bright sunlight, then "aim" the artwork directly at the sun and that will flatten the light out and remove any shadows. Use a white card or a gray card and later, use that card "reading" with the eye dropper thingie, 245 is where I like my "whites", anything brighter than that and you'll lose any detail in the whites. Anywho, get a reading of around 245 on the whites and then later, as you work in Photoshop or some editing software, you can then make EVERY piece of artwork, the same value and perfectly exposed!

What I see sometimes in peoples artwork, is a range of "lighting", say 2 images, with snow and one has nice white snow and the other a gray snow and this technique will fix that from happening.

And use the images above, of my beautiful vase and flowers, almost "Photo-realistic" I KNOW!

EXTRA POINTS, if anyone can find what STILL is wrong with "C"!

Rich

A. is too wasteful, too much stuff other than the artwork to crop out and then valuable pixels thrown out!

B. Betterer, but still a LOT to crop out.

C. Bestest! Shoot the artwork horizontally and get the top and the bottom of the viewfinder TIGHT on the edges of the artwork, so that dimension will be you smallest and no cropping needed, then just crop in the sides, as needed.

 

James McCormack

10 Months Ago

Bump, I keep coming back ' cos it's good stuff

 

Rich Franco

10 Months Ago

James,

Thank you! I enjoy sharing what I know and even some things I DON'T KNOW!!! LOL!

Rich

 

Michelle Arakawa

10 Months Ago

I was thinking about this for some of the more traditional works I do. Not on good quality tools/paper so I can never sell it, but if I can get a good shot I can at least make it a print. This will help lots.

 

Sheena A D

10 Months Ago

Good explanation! Thank you

 

Jack Torcello

10 Months Ago

"I tried this in the Louvre, but several large guys in hats picked me up bodily - and threw me and my tripod in the River Seine!!!"

What did I do wrong?! ;)

 

Rich Franco

10 Months Ago

Michelle,

I would go ahead and copy your artwork and not worry about the paper/substrate, let the buyers decide if it's right for them! As long as YOU are happy wiht the actual art, then go ahead and get more stuff on your site!

Sheena,

Thank you, let me know if you have any questions, either here or just email me....

Jack,

OBVIOUSLY, we don't try this when the damn place is OPEN! What were you thinking???

Rich

 

Fred Fronstin

10 Months Ago

Frank,
I am impressed with your breadth of knowledge!

 

Rich Franco

10 Months Ago

Fred,

Thanks! (check's in the mail, but could you hold it for a few days...???)

Rich

 

Lena Auxier

10 Months Ago

How would you photograph a graphite pencil drawing? These have been a challenge for me. I always take mine outside, and have tried in shade, cloudy and overcast skies. Its hard trying to get the white background white yet the pencil actually look good. The background most always is too grayish. My brother is a photographer and is much better than I am, so I plan on taking my drawings to him sometime and we try to figure it out lol. I just got scans from a local print shop, was not happy with them.

 

Rich Franco

10 Months Ago

Lena,

JUST SENT YOU THIS LINK! LOL!

I think with your art, really should be easy, only working with 2 "colors", white and black. When you copy the artwork, get it into Photoshop and then find the eyedropper thingie and and then the "info box, on mine, over on the top right, and see what the eyedropper reads on the "white".Normally, I try to keep white around 245 or even less, if there is a texture in the white paper/substrate. Once you have the white right!!! Then go to "adjustments" and then down to "selective color", click at the top of the box, which usually shows red to start and then click on black. Take the slider and move it back and forth and see if the black gets to be where you want it. There are probably other ways, but this is what I usually use for my stuff.

Let me know if you have any questions....

Rich

 

M G Whittingham

10 Months Ago

Hi Lena:

Here is another approach that you can try. Modern cameras are based on the gray scale. When the sensor sees too much white in the picture (in your case your paper), it can confuse the sensor and the white comes out looking an ugly shade of gray. The same thing happens when people photograph snow - most cameras will make it look gray.

Judging by your comments, I am going to guess that you don't use your camera much beyond the automatic settings. So, to make things simple try looking through your camera manual to see if your camera has a 'snow' exposure setting. Many cameras have such a setting. Try using that. Your whites should look whiter and less gray.

Hope this helps.

 

Andrea Lazar

10 Months Ago

Hi, Rich. I wanted to say a huge Thank You for what you are doing here, sharing your wealth of knowledge and expertise, freely and joyfully, helping fellow artists.

I read your bio and am so impressed! I love the lighthearted summary of what is a stellar career! Your love for art and photography, and your curiosity and ability to figure things out and master them definitely comes through it all. Your story is one of resourcefulness, a passion to follow your talent, and recognizing and having the smarts and courage to follow opportunities as they come your way. You are an inspiration, and not just for artists!

How lucky we are to have a place like this where we can learn a lifetime of lessons from you and others who so generously make themselves this rich resource for us.
I hope you are finding joy and satisfaction in this teaching chapter of your career.

Andrea


 

Rich Franco

10 Months Ago

Mom.....??? Is that you??? LOL!

Andrea, thank you for your kind words and I do enjoy sharing what I know....sometimes even stuff I don't know! LOL! Everybody here started as a newbie, from painters to photogrpahers and all artists in-between and we shouldn't lose or foget that fact. When I was in high school, back when dinosaurs roamed the Earth, I wanted to be a teacher, English teacher actually, but things didn;t work out for me back then and now, finally got my chance to teach....

Rich

 

Andrea Lazar

10 Months Ago

Rich, I should have mentioned another of your obvious strengths, a great sense of humor ---- and I bet your mom was super proud of you!

Andrea

 

Rich Franco

8 Months Ago

Bumpinsky!

Rich

 

Sticky surely? Thanks for sharing the info for everyone Rich

 

Sn Hridoy

8 Months Ago

As an artist and a creative professional you always want to push the boundaries and come up with an incredible result.


To do that, the best thing that you can do is to have the right guide and muse to help you take your project to the next level.


The body-kun figures for drawing you can find on our website, are designed to bring your creative ideas to life in a clever and unique way.
visit https://bodykunfigures.com/

 

Rich Franco

7 Months Ago

Bumpinsky!

 

Linda Kelly

6 Months Ago

thank you

 

Rich Franco

27 Days Ago

Hello!

A little dusty here, but now back in business! Thanks David D.

To re-iterate key points about artwork posted here.

1. FAA/Pixels has NO QUALITY CONTROL on the front end. Up to us, as artists to post good images. If you post an image, artwork, painting, and there's something wrong, not cropped right, light source bad(you can see where the light source is coming from), crooked, signature gets cropped off, NOT SHARP and out of focus, IF YOU SELL THIS IMAGE, the printers will cancel the order!!! That's where the Quality Control kicks in and by then, too late! Sometimes, the printer MIGHT contact you to upload a new image, but if you don't have a GOOD image to replace the bad one, you lose the order!

2. DON'T upload "marginal" images, hoping that buyers will ONLY purchase the smaller versions and the "issues" might not show up on the smaller products/sizes! This includes, images that have been ENLARGED, from less than perfect captures! Taking small captures and then trying to enlarge them to sell more products, DOES NOT WORK! PERIOD!

3. If you do have "marginal" images already posted, two things to do. Remove them and replace with perfect copies just remove them and work on newer images......there is no 3rd choice!

Okay! Hope this helps.... you know where to find me if you have any questions and if you're a SHY person like me, send me a message.....

Rich

 

Bonnie Colgan

26 Days Ago

Rich, so happy you fulfilled your dream of being a teacher...and, what a fabulous teacher you are! Congratulations! Thank you so much for sharing your talent and expertise.

A year ago, my sister in law lost her husband and at the same time went into a rehab living facility regarding mobility issues. In need of cash, she asked me to photograph their rather large south western art collection. What a challenge! Spent days trying to get images of famous artists framed watercolor work for her to showcase either on the internet or for a gallery specializing in second hand sales. Finally on several overcast days, to avoid all the glares and unwanted shadows, and by using different camera lens at different angles on my tripod, I was able to get fairly decent ones to upload for sale. No way however, could I have put into such logical order the steps and frustrations encountered that I went through to achieve the desired results. It was really a skelter helter approach and only by sheer luck and determination to help her, did I get results. Should there be a next time, I will be sure to follow your step by step guides...makes such sense!

Your ability to put words into logical steps are phenomenal and are to be commended..had I been an FAA member then and could have done a search on this topic, I would have learned so much and saved valuable time. Kudos to your former English teacher who taught you well and to you for sharing! Saving this one for sure! BTW...your kindness shines like your smiling eyes.

 

Rich Franco

26 Days Ago

Bonnie,

Check's in the mail(but could you hold it until June 15 th....???).

Thank you for your kind words. I do enjoy sharing what I know, sometimes regardless if even ASKED! LOL! I've had a storied past and any mistakes anyone here has made or WILL MAKE, been there, done that! Some night, when you can't fall asleep, read my Bio....

Copying artwork is just like any good recipe, no cutting corners if the result you want is important. Adding or subtracting from the recipe, inevitably, changes the final product and usually not for the better. Learning and then using my guidelines will ensure a professional result and as professionals here, that is what is called for.

So, I hope this does help some here and as always, here for any questions or if you're a SHY person like me, you can email me....privately.....I won't tell anyone.....

Rich

 

so helpful! thank you!

 

Rich Franco

3 Days Ago

Adrian,

Glad to help! Let me know if you have any questions....

Rich

 

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