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Angelina Tamez

8 Years Ago

Art...has Everything Been Done? Are There Any New Ideas Left?

Welcome...if you would like to wax philosophical with me...=)

There are MANY artists who inspire me. I love certain techniques and styles. Certain subjects. I adore photography. This is the first year I went for art full tilt. I have been dabbling for many years, but this year I decided, I need to stop trying to make myself do other things because in my heart I have always been an artist. It's a big decision...what you are going to do with your life. I didn't come to it lightly. I fought it, but there it is, I know now it's what I am.

Now that I am in it. I am really thinking about my mediums and subjects...and what exactly do I want to do with my art? What do I want to say to the world? Do I want to emulate techniques I love or do I want to do just one type of painting for unity?

I just watched a movie called Little Ashes. It's about Salvador Dali, I didn't know it was about him being in love with a man...but anyway, artistically I connected with the journey he was on.

Which brings me to my question...has everything been done?
Every subject I think of that inspires me and things I want to work on....even though it came from me...I look around and it's already happened in one form or another.

I don't want to replay what has been done. I want to do something that has never been done...so I reach in...looking for what is there and I can't help but wonder... has every good artistic idea been played out?

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Kevin Callahan

8 Years Ago

Yes, everything has been done. Someone will say that the new digital art is different but it is not, it is only a new platform for old ideas. In 1915 when Malevich did the Black Square there was nothing new after. The Black Square boiled all art down to its essence and we have been finding our way back ever since. But we have not done anything new. Different? Yes! of course. Abstract, Cubism, Abstract Expressionism, POP (well this is not new it is observation of that that IS) these are new ways of looking after we have been stripped down to the core. But NOT new.

 

Lawrence Supino

8 Years Ago

"I don't want to replay what has been done. I want to do something that has never been done."

;) join the club!

And that's not a tease...that's what many artist are confronted with when they take a sincere look at their "artistic" life.

"Played Out"..."Thought About" and "Tried"...are different things.

Stay away from the "played out" and try to think in terms of.... different, yet utilizing some of the same.

 

Angelina Tamez

8 Years Ago

Ok Kevin...not new.
Isn't that a problem? As artists, shouldn't we be bringing something new to the world?


Hahahaha....are you saying Lawrence that I am suffering from a normal artistic dilemma? It doesn't feel normal for me...it feels frustrating.

 

Tony Weatherman

8 Years Ago

Every time I turn around and look at this beautiful world it looks new to me. I love it. And I love photographing it.

 

Angelina Tamez

8 Years Ago

I do too. But I feel my angst even as I take the picture...this very done subject...in a very done way...

What makes my art mine? What is being said here that hasn't been said before?

Isn't it the responsibility of artists to bring "new" to the table?

 

Mark James Perry

8 Years Ago

Has it all been done? Of course not. As a civilization we are just getting started. New ideas are just that. They will be new ideas when someone thinks of them..

 

Dan Daugherty

8 Years Ago

Angelina... The same thoughts run through my mind and I'm sure many others as they either sit down or walk into a shop to begin a work. I guess this is why I like Sculpture, but I'm sure much of what I do has been thought of or even touched on before. For me, it's trying to keep creating things that move, but I think that there is nothing new under the son.

Don't be discouraged though, because there are many new ways to deliver the old ideas. Perhaps combining old ideas for a new concept.

No matter what happens, You have the right thought process!!

 

Suzanne McClendon

8 Years Ago

But you DO bring something new to the table. No one else can see it with *your* eyes, your perspective. We can be standing in front of the very same field of sunflowers, and see it entirely differently. Different things about it will impress us and will show up in our art, our photography or painting or whatever form our art takes.

What we bring new is our own vision, our own hearts. That hasn't been done before.

Just my humble opinion. :)

 

Mario Donk

8 Years Ago

New for no reason? I would say no. But regardless if everything has been done, it has not been done by me and that's all that matters.

I don't plan to copy whats been done but if I find out something similar was done so what, he did it his way, I did it mine.

As for having something to say. I can think of no quicker way to become speechless then to tell my mind that now I am going to say something profound with art.

All I do is if I am moved by something I will paint, or sculpt or photograph it. To bad if some one did it before.

As for new, if its truly new no one will recognize it or understand it much less realize it is art.

 

Lawrence Supino

8 Years Ago

lol Angelina...sorry to say...Yes.

And it won't feel normal, but...
the fact that you're thinking that way...shows you're "thinking" like many an artist...and that's a good thing.

Unfortunately this "artistic dilemma" is an un-wanted but very necessary angst in order to grow.

Like with any desired growth…you take the first steps…i.e. Your “big decision”…now you must take the questions (learning) that come with the answers.

As far as…"shouldn't we be bringing something new to the world"

We "shouldn't" be doing anything unless it pleases us and harms no one....the rest is just pleasing another. Which may work fine in social situations...but it’s not too good for the mind of an artist and our work.

If what pleases you happens to bring something new to the world...then you've done both. ;)

Hang in there...
better to start the search now than later...cause without the search...guess what? ;))

 

Robert James Hacunda

8 Years Ago

I heard Bob Dylan say something like " that song had to be sung so i wrote it so i could sing it."
he knew what was needed and that something was missing so he made it.

 

Tony Murray

8 Years Ago

No , absolutlety everything has not been done. That was a bad philosophical stand 1 thousand years ago and it is a bad stand today. But the good news is I am hoping more artists will embrace the; "It's all been done before".

Look at History, the only limitations so far has been our imagination !

 

Joe Kozlowski

8 Years Ago

There are no themes ... however there are new and innovative ways of addressing them.

If you decide to paint on canvas, you set limits.
Just deciding to paint, out of all the possible options, sets a limit.
When you cut the canvas from a roll for the painting, you set a limit.
Choose oil over acrylic ... another limit.
Its within limits that creativity happens.

The fact that there are no new themes is a limit. Embrace the limit. Pick a theme and be creative with your interpretation.

 

Vincent Von Frese

8 Years Ago

So........ then from what can be derived from this line of thinking is what; every thought has been thought? Every feeling has been felt? And then every idea has been imagined? This is clearly not the case.

It is not the case with respect to the the possibility of uncovering newness and understanding the puzzle of
the universe and the secrets not yet discovered in nature but being looked for. This is creativity. Art can result as a reflection of that.

For example; there are unknown forces not yet understood or revealed in nature which may someday be known. I believe these mysteries are not to be found in the realm of science but the realm of spirit. Art is not an idea but a by-product of the senses of human beings revealed..

 

Mario Donk

8 Years Ago

Snake I think your right, and what makes people interesting is they are different, similar but different, no two will do a thing the same way.

 

Mark James Perry

8 Years Ago

Never paint yourself into a corner........................

 

Angelina Tamez

8 Years Ago

I love the flow of thought here.

I was trying to think of something to say...but I have nothing at the moment...just reading what people think about this...I love the flow of thought.

I guess it comes down to...where do I go from here?

 

Vincent Von Frese

8 Years Ago

There are many areas of art not yet presented to maturity or even at all. For example sound itself is considerable to me as sculpture. Sculpture is not limited to visual data alone so when we connect movement of objects pyysically to sound we have an art form. Nature is full of examples to study. Taste is another as well as smell. Anyone seen the film "Perfume"?

The senses not yet discovered or harnessed like psychic senses between animals and weather are a sort of alchemic art form to explore in betrween painting canvases and sculpting Japanese waterfalls out of stone.

 

Tony Murray

8 Years Ago

Here is another example of something that I partially am involved in and that is sculptures that morph. When I was a child I was fascinated by the plastic toys in the front window of a department store that would often melt through the glass into grotesque but beautiful shapes. Snake is right, sound and sculpture is the next phase of metal work....Think Braille ! Instead of seeing music to pictures you will soon see music to moving sculpture. Like a choreograph of sorts. Some of this is partially touched on via robotics. But what I am talking about is the sound waves actually creating the sculpture. There really is no boundary if you accept that.

 

Jan Keen

8 Years Ago

We may all paint the same trees, however, Originality still exists.

 

Richard Rizzo

8 Years Ago

I agree with a few of the others, no it has not all been done, in my opinion.
Much like technological advances made through time, Art is no different, innovations in materials mixed with imagination can make it possible.

 

Randall Arthur

8 Years Ago

Angelina, I too feel that it has all been done somehow. From art to basic television we inundated with recycled ideas and expressions. I wonder if you could line up all the art, based on some topic, and make a film with each piece being a single frame of the film. Would there be an organic flow from cave paintings to computer generated media? Would this film reveal the ebb and flow of humanity somehow?

My hope is that there will once again be a new enlightenment for our species. Maybe the awaited "end of the world" scenarios are simply warnings of an old way of thinking passing and a new dawning to humanity.

I will never go see another remake of "Charlie's Angels" no matter which starlets you cast. Pray for a new and expansive growth of our species.

 

Dan Daugherty

8 Years Ago

Tony, In a way, Music is forming my sculptures...I hear it while I create my work and in a way channel the energy into my work. I have been known to change the beat if it leans toward the more depressing side...I like it positive and energetic..

I agree in the originality, As I type, I am actually planning an abstract, the second of two I have had Ideas for. This is something new for me as I have never done an abstract of my own. I hope it does have that "New" feel to it

Having said that, it is still the same Idea, just someone else doing it and simply another variation.

If there is a different way to create a different type of art, one will have to create the method, and just how many more methods are there??

 

Robin Pocisk

8 Years Ago

One thing I love about online art is that I can create something, then scan through to see if there's anything out there that's really close. When you do this enough times, you get a good idea of how original your artwork is. To create something new is perhaps unrealistic but I am satisfied if my art is set apart by my style.

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Angela Gale

8 Years Ago

Well, I find that it's more difficult for artists to be unique now of days with all that has been done, but I agree that each person is unique and that's what can shine through in a persons work.

The abstract world certainly leaves more room for creativity and acrylics open a new world of possibilities. They now have acrylics that are almost like oils, but I haven't tried them so I do not know about the quality.

This reminds me of something I was reading about creativity, don't try to do it, just let it happen. Experiment, have fun & let your right brain take over at times, or always. Something new or different is bound to show up :)

 

Larry Darnell

8 Years Ago

Gessen was an artist monk. Before he would start a drawing or painting he always insisted upon being paid in advance, and his fees were high. He was known as the "Stingy Artist."

A geisha once gave him a commission for a painting. "How much can you pay?" inquired Gessen.

"Whatever you charge," replied the girl, "but I want you to do the work in front of me."

So on a certain day Gessen was called by the geisha. She was holding a feast for her patron.

Gessen with fine brush work did the painting. When it was completed he asked the highest sum of his time.

He received his pay. Then the geisha turned to her patron, saying: "All this artist wants is money. His paintings are fine but his mind is dirty; money has caused it to become muddy. Drawn by such a filthy mind, his work is not fit to exhibit. It is just about good enough for one of my petticoats."

Removing her skirt, she then asked Gessen to do another picture on the back of her petticoat.

"How much will you pay?" asked Gessen.

"Oh, any amount," answered the girl.

Gessen named a fancy price, painted the picture in the manner requested, and went away.

It was learned later that Gessen had these reasons for desiring money:

A ravaging famine often visited his province. The rich would not help the poor, so Gessen had a secret warehouse, unknown to anyone, which he kept filled with grain, prepared for those emergencies.

From his village to the National Shrine the road was in very poor condition and many travellers suffered while traversing it. He desired to build a better road.

His teacher had passed away without realizing his wish to build a temple, and Gessen wished to complete this temple for him.

After Gessen had accomplished his three wishes he threw away his brushes and artist's materials and, retiring to the mountains, never painted again.


http://www.ashidakim.com/zenkoans/zenindex.html

 

Angelina Tamez

8 Years Ago

Thank you Liza, for inviting me to go first.
I have my own interpretation but I have no idea what this statement is commonly believed to mean.

I am interested in what others think it means, why don't you go first?

Larry, that is a fantastic story, my son and I enjoyed it very much.

 

Kevin Sherf

8 Years Ago

I think it means that Picasso was enamored of his role as the bad guy, the destroyer of victorian sensibilities in art and that he liked pulling chains and tossing out clever little bon mots that the press would go ape shit over. And that if he knew that in the year 2010 people would be using his throw away lines to pretend to educate ARTISTS to the true nature of art and ethics he would stand slackjawed for awhile and then burst out laughing at the idiocy of the future.

 

Angelina Tamez

8 Years Ago

LOL

You know, part of me says, you could be totally right Kevin. I guess Liza is out or didn't want to answer.

Ok, I say what I thought when I read it. I will preface it by saying I really have no idea what it's suppose to mean.
"Bad artists copy" To me, that's mocking realism, that many artists try only to copy what they see.
"Good artists steal" This is probably way off, but I think it means that instead of copying what you see, you should steal from it what it all comes down to "it's essence" in other words.

I'm probably way off altogether, but that's what I thought.

 

Marlene Burns

8 Years Ago

when you copy something, you do not take ownership. when you steal it, you make it your own.

 

Angelina Tamez

8 Years Ago

OOh! I like that Mom!! =)

 

Vincent Von Frese

8 Years Ago

The whole thesis of cubism and the Picasso primitivism as a portriat of modern people in mask for example was based upon the concept originated by painters in Paris in his time;

"You paint what you know is there, not what you can see" (Picasso) But what if you see what is there but do not know what is there? It's so psychological because you have to know what's inside yourself as well. To know what is inside, the substance or essence and mabe spirit if the subject of your art, is a form of freedom. It's a doubt in the work that other people sense, hense the art made in this venue (what you feel and know to be true) is strong.

This is a great approach which immediately frees an artist up from the usual illustration of surfaces and propels one into the poetics and impressions of things, ideas which are your personal expression.

I think a modern artist's ability to arrange and re-arrange the elements within an artwork sets them apart as an individual artist's experience. The most primitive art of ancient artists were really a language telling the story of their experience of their time.




 

Angelina Tamez

8 Years Ago

I just saw this Kevin!!!

"Damn multiverse! screwing around with my temporally challenged brain.AARRGGHHH!"

LOLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL

 

Marlene Burns

8 Years Ago

thank you, dear daughter.

as to my own experience in the past year.....i have a series of paintings based on hebrew prayers. i loosely utilized my style, ( in the style of AE, though the movement is long gone) and married my passion for painting with my passion for my religion.
i have combined my studies and reading others' commentaries on the words and use all this to prep. i chant the words as i paint.
the product is very different from other religious interpretations in art in that i have no overt symbolism, though each painting is filled with my own symbology through color and movement.
to my knowledge, it's not being done by anyone else in such a way...most loose religious work has flying jewish symbols ( chagall) or realistic images of the ritual objects or inclusion of the hebrew words themselves.

now.. the important part...did i set out to create something new? nope.
i was actually shocked that i could no longer separate out my religious influence in my brain each morning, so i allowed it to be.
point being, i don't think you can force something new..it will evolve. after the fact, you'll be able to identify it.

 

LAF Art

8 Years Ago

Marlene, I think you've hit the nail on the head, forcing art seems to me to result in stiff and self conscious work. Hopefully we and our work are always evolving

 

Larry Darnell

8 Years Ago

Marlene - Ben Shahn did a nice series of Hebrew-themed paintings that might interest you.

Someone somewhere wrote photos have a soul - can't speak for all images, but we all know those enduring works have the artist's soul banging a drum.

 

Marlene Burns

8 Years Ago

yes, larry, i am very familiar with ben's work....and a perfect example of overt symbols used.

 

Gene Gregory

8 Years Ago

To my sweet daughter Angelina...... I hope you and your family have a wonderful Christmas, and a happy holiday season!
Dad

 

Laurette Escobar

8 Years Ago

i haven't read any of the replies so this may be a repeat.

i believe everything has been done (style, theme, subject matter) the only thing that can really expand is technology.

 

Angelina Tamez

8 Years Ago

Thank you Dad!! =)
I hope your Christmas and New Year's are unforgettable!! Please let me know if you are going to be in my direction any time soon. We can meet at Landon's or go out for lunch? I am leaving very soon...3-4 weeks.

Hellooooooooooooooooooooo Laurette. You may want to read the replies...they have been very interesting. People are very split.

 

Yury Yanin

8 Years Ago

Someone said in one of our discussions that “art is all about feelings”. I agree… Love, for instance…
Angelina, I’ve heard that in old times someone has already loved a girl. Does it mean that I shouldn’t love a girl any more and must invent something new? I can, but what for? I see nothing wrong with the old fashioned love. Love is precious and worth repeating.
A lot of people wrote poetry about love before Shakespeare and after him, and still “Romeo and Juliet” is the outstanding masterpiece of all times. I am sure that there can be a lot of new ideas in art yet. We can look for them to evaluate perspectives, but I see nothing wrong with the repetition of the old ways. I believe that the progress in art is provided most of all by the increase of its impact on public, not only by absolutely new ways and ideas.

 

Angelina Tamez

8 Years Ago

Well stated Yury.

Interesting point, changing the impact something has on people is something new. Even if it is a subject well used, or a medium well used.

Hmm...poetic Larry, an artist's soul beating on a drum....I really like that.

 

Yury Yanin

8 Years Ago

Well, Angelina,... I was editing my post a bit, while your were writing your reply. Glad you saw my point.

 

Larry Darnell

8 Years Ago

Sweet mystery of life - there are a few of things some of us don't know - why life persists in the face of death, why life at all, what happens next. There are those who know what happens next, but not really. The human condition has been faced with these issues since becoming self aware. Art expresses variations on these themes, all with unique, and yet, common understandings across cultures and ages. Except for those with all the answers, most of us poke about holding a question mark. Oddly, those who seem to know everything produce the most flat art, see that which came from Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia - and that which is so plentiful from fundamentalist religion and other right wing knowitalls.

While sometimes it seems our lives are often the summer reruns of some creepy tent show, there is the escapism of nature where you can sometimes believe you can shut off the noise. At a fundamental level, art can be a cultural analgesic - I don't know if the need for that had much use in the past, but it can surely make your cubicle a little less sad.

There's scientific evidence there is no past, present or future - infinite potentialities occurring simultaneously - so there's a pretty good case everyone's right with every opinion. It's enough to make you want to do everything while doing nothing at the same time.

 

Angelina Tamez

8 Years Ago

Larry...I think that may be where I am right now..."It's enough to make you want to do everything while doing nothing at the same time."

I want to dive deeper into photography. So I am saving for a DSLR...the cheaper ones aren't that great of course, so I am saving for a mid range...then the lenses are expensive. God...by the time I save all the money up to buy the camera and then the lenses there is a good chance the camera will be so outdated I will need to start saving for the next one. That's just equipment. For one medium. I'm trying to learn PS...I am just scratching the surface on that.

Then, there is my painting. Completely different basket I am weaving there.

Subject, content....so many great things I am interested in, and then I see a thousand of the same subject or idea....

It is all kinda overwhelming sometimes.

 

What a strange Family ;-)

 

Angelina Tamez

8 Years Ago

LOLLLLLL....truer words may never have been spoken Cristopher....lol.

Merry Christmas!

I am surprised how deeply divided artists are on this...it has all been done...and no it hasn't. When I started the post, I was on one side...now I have ended up on the other. Strange indeed...

 

Yury Yanin

8 Years Ago

Larry, I don’t feel personally offended, but I feel that the Soviet art is offended in a way by your generalization. It is not fare to the ART. I want to defend not myself or my position, but actual art, including the Soviet art. Are you sure that you know all Soviet art enough for such generalizations?
I suppose that someone told you, for instance, that Kandinsky was one of the founders of abstract art in the world, but forgot to tell you that he was a Soviet painter and one of the first and most influential founders of Soviet school of painting. May be you were told that Kandinsky was an enemy of the USSR, that his art was prohibited in the Soviet Union. It is a lie. He supported the revolution and then was a representative of Soviet Academy of Art in Berlin in 20th. He had to emigrate to France after Nazis came to power in Germany. Being already internationally famous, he worked world wide, but he ever tried to save his connections with Soviet art society and with the Soviet authorities. His art was never prohibited, but was always appreciated in the USSR, it was always included into all artistic education programs.
Another famous Russian artist Rerih also supported the revolution, but soon he had to remove from Petrograd to Finland because of his lungs illness. He was a representative of Soviet art commission together with Gorky and Benua in Finland. He also had to move to another country when nationalistic Finish authorities closed the frontier with the USSR. He was already known all over the world as an artist and as a famous philosopher and as such he supported Lenin in his philosophical writings from his own, rather mystical, point of view. Some people even called him Soviet agent, communistic propagandist and suspected that his secret mission is the communist revolution in the whole world, sponsored by the USSR. In fact his goal was the artistic and philosophical truth. He traveled, lived in USA and then in India, but also never lost his connection with Soviet Union, wanted to return to the USSR and told his son to do so, left almost all his artistic and philosophical heritage to the Soviet Government, which became a great part of the Soviet culture and art.
Now look at the beginning of this thread, where Kevin mentioned about one more world famous Soviet artist - Malevich. Don’t you know that Malevich has lived in USSR for all his life? His influence on the development of the Soviet visual art is even greater then his great influence on the world art, which Kevin mentioned here.
Art and theories of those 3 world famous artists made a great, fundamental part of the Soviet visual art. I’d never dare to call that part as “flat art”. I mentioned only 3 of the Russian artists, who influenced the Soviet visual art from the very beginning. It seems that some people still remember their art, but not themselves in USA. There were a lot of other talented painters in the USSR, less known in USA. It seems that the same creatures, who told you about the “flat Soviet art” never bothered to show you their art, because it could contradict their primitive propagandistic schemes.
Believe me, I’ve been ever critical about Soviet authorities and ideologists and I had my own very real reasons for it. I also understand the temptation of primitive generalizations: Hitler is bad, and the art in his country is bad, Stalin is bad and the Soviet art is bad, etc. It seems logical and correct. However, let’s be fare. Life and art are much more complicated then that, they can not be as primitive as propagandistic schemes. Real art is a daring, sincere passion of talented persons and no censorship could ever command it. If no one can tell you the truth in USA, come to Russia, visit museums. You will find a lot of surprises.
Sorry to contradict your view, I had to write that to be fare to ART.

 

Larry Darnell

8 Years Ago

Yury -

I appreciate your post.

The mistake in my prose was to seem to include all art in the Soviet and Nazi statement. My intent was to characterize state-sponsored art in particular, which would also include US-sponsored propaganda of the same period. That which is promoted by those with all the answers is, inevitably, flat.

Kindly understand I have as much disdain for those without an understanding or appreciation of the value of artistic expression no matter what flag they fly; and a belief in the ultimate ascendancy of artistic pluralism over any social or economic schema.

 

Yury Yanin

8 Years Ago

Larry, be sure I have no ill feelings about your post or yourself. More then it, your reply inspired me for one more thought, which may seem rather interesting for someone of us:
Have you ever seen any ugly face or an image of evil on commissioned portraits? I suppose not. No one would pay money for seeing himself like that on the resulting painting. The same with the state orders - no political power will pay to an artist, who shows that power negatively. But any artist wants to eat. A rare professional artist is rich enough to last long without commissions. That’s why a great part of official visual art all over the world may seem very much similar – technically sound, flat, neither talented nor emotional and equally hypocritical.
Now imagine the situation in Russia. Before the revolution artists had to please czar, his censors, aristocrats and other people of ruling classes, because only people of that kind were able to order paintings from them. Naturally they supported the revolution, hoping for more freedom in their art. After the revolution they enjoyed their personal freedom in art for some time. That was the time of a rapid development of art of all kinds and styles in Russia/Soviet Union. Kandinsky, Malevich, Rerih and many others proved or first deserved their fame in that time. However, soon all Soviet artists found out that there were no rich people left in Soviet Russia, who were able to order artistic job personally. The ruling political power begun to built a new ideology and had no intention to support art, which didn’t fit their plans. Artists still wanted to eat. Freedom of art was declared by the Soviet ruling power, but that freedom was not supported economically. That’s why many artists left Russia for other countries, were they could sell their art and find commissions. Even the most notoriously known Soviet communist writer and communistic activist Maxim Gorky widely supported by Soviet Government, lived and wrote his revolutionary novels and poems in Italy in that time. One of our most revolutionary poets Fet stopped to write his poetry at all and became an ordinary Soviet bureaucrat in the Ministry of culture. Our famous poets Majakovsky and Esenin committed suicides…
Now imagine: in all times, before the revolution and after it, there always were daring, honest and talented artists in Russia, who served their own artistic ideas and were able to find ways for creating a real, independent art, overcoming all that! They were powerful persons, talented artists and they created a really powerful art. In my previous post I wrote mostly about them. Their art influenced all Soviet art and became its inner core, its essence, while commissioned art of many others, also talented, but personally weak artists had passed away and is already forgotten by now. Due to that I can say that the real art is always more powerful then any political ruling power and its censorship. I just don’t want us to forget about that inner power of the Russian/Soviet art. It could be unwise, dishonest and not fare to forget that.
Sorry for my bad English and talkative nature.

 

Roger Swezey

8 Years Ago

Angelina,
Very early in this thread Suzanne (forgive me, I didn't get her last name).wrote, what I totally agree with it..It's your own unique vision.that matters

Allowing your eyes to see, unfettered by preconceptions (easier said then done) it will start developing it's own discerning discipline. Allowing it to freely nurture, your unique vision will shine through. It's not for you, to decide it's uniqueness. Just let your hands document what your eyes see, whether it's the outside world or your inner mind .

Just go for it!!!

 

Angelina Tamez

8 Years Ago

Thank you Roger...for that encouragement.

Marlene had something something in the effect of, as artist matures, their own style and uniqueness comes out, that it couldn't be forced.

I appreciate it Roger...and I will keep keep trying to let my visions shine through.

Thank you to everyone who participated on this thread.

I started this thread thinking everything has been done, and I close it now believing everything has not been done. =)

 

This discussion is closed.