Transform your photos into one-of-a-kind, hand painted masterpieces!

Return to Main Discussion Page
Discussion Quote Icon

Discussion

Main Menu | Search Discussions

Search Discussions
 
 

Michael Hoard

14 Days Ago

At The Right Place At The Right Time With Camera In Hand Mammatus Clouds

Have you ever missed out on the opportunity of that photo and you did not have your camera? In the discussion photo is the actual beginning of the formation of the rare Mammatus Clouds. On Monday evening February 4. 2019 I did have my camera with me, generally I never leave the house without my camera.

New Orleans was showcase to a very rare cloud formations caused from sinking air instead or rising air. I was at a local coffee shop in the Lower Garden District called the Irish Channel. Having coffee with a long time friend I noticed familiar and odd cloud layers above the building across the street above a neighborhood firehouse.

I mentioned to my friend I was going to go take a look, well to my surprise there was the start of a very rare display the formation of Mammatus cloud formations. I have seen them only a few times throughout my lifetime but display was the most dramatic especially over New Orleans. Within a few minutes of taking photos, I noticed a fireman across the street at the firehouse and I yelled take a look he walked towards me and he turned around and was in awe and disbelief of what he was viewing. He had never seen anything like that display, before long people were stopping in their cars and taking a look and taking photos with their cell phone.

In most cases these cloud formations are related to the anvil of a thunderstorm, the usual circumstance there were no storms in the vicinity. The only rain on radar was South and West from New Orleans over 80 miles away. In some instances you will see these clouds at sunset on the underside of the anvil of a thunderstorm in the upper atmosphere The large crowd which gathered thanked me for bringing this rare event to their attention everyone was so busy pre-occupied walking by looking at their phones did not notice looking up.

I presented my collection of photos to the local Fox 8 News Weather Meteorological Department, I received numerous emails from the past chief meteorologist and present weather personnel of my dramatic photographs. Instead of seeing clouds rising billowing upwards you see the clouds forming billowing downwards. What is so unique about this particular formation of clouds no wind associated at ground level. These particular type of clouds can be very serious for air travel, pilots generally avoid flying near them and will change course it could mean severe turbulence or a disaster. Having piloted a Cessna 150 and glider plane and fascination of clouds at an early age I had knowledge of these fascinating cloud formations.

Most individuals when they see these cloud formations pretty much fearful of a monster storm approaching which is not necessarily the case. All variables weather conditions must be exact including the light which plays a part of the intensity of shadows. These spectacular clouds are generally seen in the evening hours after large thunder storms generally from the anvil of a thunderstorm....I wanted to share with everyone my rare photos of Mammatus Clouds......

The series of images I captured was presented to the Fox 8 Channel TV meterological weather department. I have received numberous emails from various past and current meteorologist of the rare spectacular images I captured....

Reply Order

Post Reply
 

Michael Hoard

14 Days Ago

Abbie or any moderator, I uploaded these photos like any other images I have since being a member here at Fine Art America. When I take a image in New Orleans, I have always begin the keyword with Nola, New Orleans to assure my images appear in this region. Not a single image of my Mammatus images are to be found in the Nola, or New Orleans keyword search for recent post, featured images, they are no where to be found?


Here are a few of the rare cloud formations over the Uptown Garden District of New Orleans The Irish Channel For those curious the blue tint was created by my anti glare lens filter on my 300 mm lens. The first images was the first impression of what was going to occur, I had seen that while inside the coffee shop then stepped outside and watched the formations unfold sinking downwards....


Sell Art Online Sell Art Online Photography Prints Sell Art Online Art Prints Art Prints

 

Gaby Ethington

14 Days Ago

Neat photographs! I love clouds and cloud formations. I see Mammatous clouds here in north Texas a few times a year. These type clouds are so interesting!

 

Michael Hoard

14 Days Ago

Hello Gaby, they sure are fascinating cloud formation and rarely ever seen here in New Orleans. All other places besides New Orleans get the opportunity to watch the unique cloud formation form. They resemble giant cotton balls drifting downwards, tubed shaped clouds which for some think the worse storm is approaching.... all the bystanders who had never witnessed the formation of Mammatus Clouds stood and marveled at the site, the entire event did not last very long at all.

 

Rose Santuci-Sofranko

14 Days Ago

So cool! I would love to see those type of clouds in person/real life. I love photographing clouds. Thanks for sharing them.

 

Michael Hoard

13 Days Ago

Greetings Rose, hopefully one day you will get the opportunity to watch Mammatus cloud formations. They are quite amazing to view and so different from other cloud formations everything has to be exact, the time of day and your location in relation to a thunderstorm, generally evening, most midday to evening especially nearing sunset. In this particular instance the only storm anywhere New Orleans well over 80 miles away south and west of the city.

This particular cloud formation can not be related to tornado's, or hurricanes, they do form on the underside of an anvil of a thunderstorm which rises to the upper atmosphere off generally in sight away from you. That long cloud bank which is the cloud formation which is sheered from the top of a typical thunderstorm. Keeping fingers crossed you get to see these remarkable cloud formations.....

They're also a rare example of clouds in sinking air-- most clouds form in rising air. Although mammatus most frequently form on the underside of a cumulonimbus, they can develop underneath cirrocumulus, altostratus, altocumulus and stratocumulus. ... Mammatus result from the sinking of moist air into dry air.

 

Gaby Ethington

13 Days Ago

Hi Michael,
I just uploaded this one to show you. I get a thrill when taking odd sky photos - I took this one in June of last year:

Sell Art Online

 

Michael Hoard

13 Days Ago

Hello Gabby, wowzzza that sure is dramatic, great photograph. They are so impressive when forming directly below you and the images off in the distance and lightning are equally impressive to view......thanks for sharing your sensational photograph! I enjoyed viewing your sensational gallery and the cloud photos in one of your gallery's.......

 

JC Findley

13 Days Ago

Michael

The search hasn't updated in a few days so that is why they aren't showing. Abbie was working on that.

 

Michael Hoard

13 Days Ago

Hello JC, wow, thank you so much for checking into that, I sure appreciate it, I hope Abbie is doing better now.. I had never run into this problem before now I know the search was not updating....Thank you also Abbie......

 

Jestephotography Ltd

13 Days Ago

Wikid!

 

Dorothy Berry-Lound

13 Days Ago

Michael we get Mammatus Clouds here up the mountain in Italy from time to time. This image is based on a photograph I took couple of years ago. We had seen them previously and I had just called them 'dippy clouds' LOL. Then one day I was reading something about cloud formations and realized they were something special.

Mammatus Storm Clouds Over Paciano Italy by Dorothy Berry-Lound

 

Fabrizio Ruggeri

13 Days Ago

Micheal, I remember a unique sky scene when I was in Reading in 1990. Either it was shortly after the sunset, I suppose it was toward east, or there was the moon, I can'r recall well. The sky had a unique effect like dense veinings in marble, it was like a deep blue marble with beatiful white veinings. It was evening or maybe even night. I looked upward just by chance.

Like the fireman of your tale, people don't look up and they miss a lot the sky has to offer. I wanted to tell everybody near me "look upward!" but I was shy. I remember staying for some minutes looking at the clouds, it really was new to me.

I saw this only once in my life, I don't know if you can reconduct this to a specific formation name. It might be that it is something rare in Italy and not so rare in England.

 

Gaby Ethington

13 Days Ago

Thank you, Michael for your kind words and looking at my gallery. This is an interesting discussion I have enjoyed!
Wow, Dorothy! Beautiful!

 

Doug Swanson

13 Days Ago

Cool pictures. I've seen "mammas" more times than I want to, but they are fascinatingly strange, upside down clouds. Fortunately, if they are associated with a tornado, it's likely that you are seeing them after the worst threat has passed, since what goes up in the updraft or funnel comes down behind it. I've been way too close to 4 tornadoes in my life, but only saw one because I was generally running to hide in the nearest deep basement. Fortunately actual, on the ground, twisters only cause some of the mammato-cumulus clouds; many are caused by more run-of-the-mill thunderstorms that are not as threatening.

The one that I actually DID see was right on a beach in North Carolina. It got seriously threatening, very suddenly, and I didn't want to use the word, but I told my family that we should leave the beach RIGHT NOW, "so we don't get rained on". Having seen other such storms visiting family in the mid-west as a kid, I knew the look in the sky. Next thing I knew, the world was going 'round in circles for some seconds, sand was flying everywhere, we made it back to the beach house and the roof stayed on. Fortunately, it would have been categorized as a weak F0, nobody got hurt and it broke up quickly, but there it was, full of sand and beach umbrellas, moving along the beach.

 

Jon Glaser

13 Days Ago

May I be so bold as to suggest storm chasing photography workshops...I found a few,,am going to try next year and spoke to someone already..actually safer than I expected..its a hole new genre

 

Susan Wiedmann

12 Days Ago

Thanks for posting these, Michael! They are a great reminder to take time out and look up!

Hope all is well with you in NOLA.

 

Doug Swanson

12 Days Ago

OK, here you go. It's not a tornado, but the look is about right, shot in Ocean City, Maryland while we were leaving the beach as a sudden storm approached. It did crank up to a big, windy downpour, but we were back on the beach in an hour.

Art Prints

 

Joseph Baril

10 Days Ago

I captured this water spout starting to form.

Photography Prints

And this downdraft associated with wind sheer microburst.

Sell Art Online

 

Post Reply

Please login before posting a reply to this message.   If you do not have an account on Fine Art America, click here to create one!

Username

Password