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Michael Putthoff

11 Days Ago

Soft Edges In Landscape Photographs

I've recently got a Nikon D850 and I'm having an issue with the edges being soft. Wherever I'm focusing is fine but as I look at the right and left sides it gets softer. Is that normal or is there something I'm doing wrong? I'm using a Nikkor 24-70mm lens (without vr), a tripod and a remote shutter.

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David Smith

11 Days Ago

Test your lens at all f stops and various focal lengths.

Find the combination that is sharpest.

The lens itself might be slightly out of spec, but all zoom lenses are a compromise.

 

Robert Potts

11 Days Ago

Sound advice from David. These hi-rez cameras let us see everything more clearly. The 24-70 is supposed to be a good lens, but maybe not good enough for the latest camera? At any rate, I would expect the prints to be pretty good. Lenses are getting larger, heavier, and more expensive with some good reasons.

 

Jeff Sinon

11 Days Ago

I think Robert may have hit on the answer. I know with Canon they came out with their MkII lenses, 70-200, 24-70, etc, for the newer high mp cameras they were coming out with.

 

Mike Savad

11 Days Ago

is this a full frame or a crop? the full may expose the fact that the edge were never used in the cropped sensor and your seeing it now. lenses have sweet spots, the edges often suffer if its a cheap lens. as said try different F stops, it usually has a sweet point where the number makes everything in focus. do you have any examples?


----Mike Savad
http://www.MikeSavad.com

 

Rich Franco

11 Days Ago

Michael,

Soft? Or just slightly not as sharp? Just at the WIDE end or throughout the lens range? ALL telephoto lens will suffer at some point, compared to prime lenses and even those can have issues, regardless of the cost!

What I tell my students that have issues, is this. Set up your camera and tripod AND cable release and also MIRROR LOCK-UP and then using a wall or garage door, tape either a newspaper or cardboard that has nice fine fonts and copy that, at different ranges and F-stops, of your camera. Then look for some consistent "softness" in the ranges of 24-70. You don't have to use every single MM, just the ones you usually use, wide, 50mm and then 70.

If you find some real issues, you might be able to return the lens. If not, the simplest "fix" is to shoot a bit wider and then crop that edge out!

Hope this helps,

Rich

 

Michael Putthoff

11 Days Ago

Thank you everyone for your comments!

David I’ll give that a try!
Mike I’ll try to post an example soon!
Rich thanks for the advice, to me it seems considerably less sharp on the edges at all focal lengths more so at the wider ones.

 

Rich Franco

11 Days Ago

Michael,

Silly question, but have you looked at the back of the lens and made sure there is now oil/smudge/fingerprints there?

If the lens is kinda newish, maybe contact Nikon and see what they have to say. Might have a bunch of these lenses that have issues and will replace it. If this is a cheap plastic "kit" lens, then probably not.....

Have you had the sensor cleaned recently, maybe debris on the sides?

Maybe time to look on eBay for a new OLD lens.....

Rich

 

Mike Savad

11 Days Ago

oh yeah that happened to me the first time, the back of the lens was covered in filth and everything looked bad. once cleaned, it was much better. it was practically fogged over, and it was a new lens.

i've heard of cameras in the past where the cmos wasn't totally seated flat, and was tilted. and everything was oddly blurred.


----Mike Savad
http://www.MikeSavad.com

 

Brian Wallace

11 Days Ago

I've read your opening several times and maybe I'm missing something but it isn't clear to me if you're viewing the image after capture or through the eyepiece. So, taking nothing for granted, if it's viewing before capture, make sure the eye piece is also clean and focused for your eyesight.

 

Rick Berk

11 Days Ago

I have the D850 as well. I don't have that lens, but I find my Tamron 24-70 G2 does fairly well corner to corner stopped down to f11. The D850 is VERY revealing of all flaws, however, so if you have a bum lens, you'll see it for sure.

 

Michael Putthoff

11 Days Ago

Rich, I hadn't locked up the mirror and once I did that it seemed to fix whatever issue the lens/camera was having. Thanks for the help.
Brian it was after I had taken the image and viewed it on the review screen and in lightroom.
Thanks everyone for the help!!!

 

David Smith

11 Days Ago

While an improperly installed sensor will exhibit focus issues, it's usually sharp on one side and gradually goes soft as you get to the other.

How old is the lens? If the design is a remanent of film days the issue may be that the lens has a slightly curved plane of focus matching the curvature of film.

Many older lens designs have this issue.

 

Michael Putthoff

11 Days Ago

David the lens is new.

 

Rich Franco

10 Days Ago

Micael,

MLU is usually an issue at certain shutter speeds! The flapping of the shutter can easily cause internal shake and a soft image!

Rich

 

Greg Norrell

10 Days Ago

I use the non-VR Nikon 24-70mm on a D850 and it's sharp. Perhaps you should utilize the micro-adjustment calibration feature to adjust the lens-camera combo for maximum sharpness.

Edit: After reading the other posts, I should mention that I almost always shoot with the mirror locked up unless the subject is wildlife and I need faster shooting.

 

Rich Franco

10 Days Ago

Greg,

I've never done that, I have Canon, older Canon lenses, but wouldn't the entire image be soft, not just the edges?

Rich

 

Greg Norrell

10 Days Ago

@Rich - The edges are bound to be inferior to some degree relative to the center of the lens. Nikon cameras have a micro-adjustment feature for each body-lens combination. The basic idea is that while one body may be within acceptable specs, and a lens likewise within a range of acceptable specs, the combination may not, resulting in slight back or forward focusing. It seems plausible to me that a slightly off lens might look acceptable in the center, but not at the edges. So there's a procedure for using a test image (commercially available, but I use a printed fractal pattern with high contrast) to make sure each of my lenses is properly calibrated to each body.

All that said, as Rick mentioned above, the D850 will reveal flaws that would not be seen with a significantly smaller megapixel camera. I almost invariably use a tripod with the mirror locked up and a remote shutter release, unless I'm moving around. When shooting handheld, the D850 pretty much requires a shorter exposure than a lower megapixel camera.

 

David Smith

10 Days Ago

Michael

Just checked and that lens was released in 2007. If I remember correctly, Nikon had just released a full frame body, the D3.

The design might be in need of an upgrade.

 

Greg Norrell

9 Days Ago

There is a newer version of this lens with VR, but the 24-70mm F2.8G ED has been the centerpiece of the Nikon Trinity since it was released. It should produce awesome shots on a D850.

 

Rich Franco

9 Days Ago

Greg,

Yes another example on the 850, of the sensor surpassing the glass...

Rich

 

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