Looking for design inspiration?   Browse our curated collections!

Return to Main Discussion Page
Discussion Quote Icon

Discussion

Main Menu | Search Discussions

Search Discussions
 
 

Yuri Tomashevi

11 Days Ago

Dangerous Hand Sanitizers

Just FYI

FDA updates on hand sanitizers consumers should not use

https://www.fda.gov/drugs/drug-safety-and-availability/fda-updates-hand-sanitizers-consumers-should-not-use

They used methanol instead of ethanol.

Reply Order

Post Reply
 

DK Digital

11 Days Ago

If you need to sanitize frequently you should wear gloves regardless of the sanitizer type you are using. All of them contain chemicals that can be absorbed through the skin and into the blood stream and damage the liver. Under normal use like once or twice a day it's fine, but if you have a job that requires you to sanitize frequently then you should wear gloves and sanitize your gloved hands. That's what they do at my local grocery store, wear gloves and sanitize between each customer.

 

Joann Vitali

11 Days Ago

I touch a lot of clothing materials handled by a good amount of people throughout the day, so I always wear gloves. I have several sprayer bottles that I fill up with isopropyl alcohol and spray them frequently.
The hand sanitizer, made with aloe and ethanol, I was using before I started wearing the gloves dried my hands out considerably.

 

Mike Savad

11 Days Ago

they rushed to make more and dropped a bunch of rules. and ended up making a lot of poison.

straight alcohol will destroy your hands by the way. you want to avoid that as much as possible. just wash your hands with a moisturizing soap. or your hands will crack very easily.


----Mike Savad
http://www.MikeSavad.com

 

David Randall

11 Days Ago

It seems to me washing my hands is enough. I probably wash mine five or ten times a day possibly more. But that's just me.

 

Mike Savad

11 Days Ago

i used the gel early on and badly dried my hands. i try not to use it unless i have to. like i'm not near a sink or the like. emergency stuff. i always have one in my pocket now just in case.


----Mike Savad
http://www.MikeSavad.com

 

Jessica Jenney

11 Days Ago

Only soap and water for me!

 

Jennifer White

11 Days Ago

A Dr friend says gloves carry more virus' then our own hands. They stick to gloves and then spread to everything you touch until you wash them or throw them away. Your skin is washed more often. She said the virus can't got through skin. It has to be through, nose, mouth, eyes, ect, Keeping hands away from face is best and regardless, gloves or no gloves if you touch your face and your hands or gloves has it, then you can catch it.

We're in public a lot and use a lot of sanitizer along with wearing our FAA masks. Keeping hands away from face is hard especially when having to adjust mask so we go through a lot of sanitizer. I carry it with me on shoots. It's a shame some sanitizers are not what they should be.

 

Abbie Shores

11 Days Ago

I wouldn't wash my hands in good alcohol. It's not what alcohol is for

 

I work at a garbage dump and use hand sanitizer pretty regularly. My fiancee is a nurse and does the same thing. It's always a good idea if you feel the need to use it frequently to carry some moisturizing hand cream around with you just to keep your hands from drying out.

 

I work at a garbage dump and use hand sanitizer pretty regularly. My fiancee is a nurse and does the same thing. It's always a good idea if you feel the need to use it frequently to carry some moisturizing hand cream around with you just to keep your hands from drying out.

 

Doug Swanson

11 Days Ago

I had a long ago career in a pathogenic lab and had to be on the regimen of hand washing with scary soap frequently. You need to keep the lotion coming or you hands will turn to dust. Lately, I've just been trying to carefully parse out the occasions when I touch things out in the world.

 

Yuri Tomashevi

11 Days Ago

https://en.unesco.org/news/how-soap-kills-covid-19-hands

Water alone may rinse off dirt, but viruses and bacteria are so small they often need chemical and mechanical intervention to get their sticky nanoparticles out of the crevices that make up our unique fingerprints. That’s why soap is so important. It’s made for this job. Give soap 20 seconds, at least, of thorough scrubbing and the pin-shaped molecules will penetrate the types of bacteria and viruses, including COVID-19, that protect themselves with an oily lipid membrane. Like a nail popping a tire, the water-repelling end of the soap molecule, a hydrophobic tail that can bond with oil and fats, stabs COVID-19 and leaves the virus a deflated and broken sack of RNA cells.

And while alcohol can also break an oily membrane, washing with soap has the added benefit of physically removing even tougher to break viruses and bacteria from the skin. This is thanks to the dual nature of soap molecules. As the hydrophilic, or water-loving, heads reach out to bond with the water, the tails turn inwards to protect themselves from the water and by doing so, scoop up anything they catch in tiny soap bubble cages called micelles. Scrubbing all parts of your hands and wrists vigorously, with a sudsy lather, is key to locking these invading particles away for good - and washing them down the drain. And whether the water is cold or warm doesn’t matter, so long as it’s soapy.

The World Health Organization recommends scrubbing the wrists, palms and backs of your hands, the spaces in-between your fingers in an interlacing motion, making fists around each thumb and rubbing your fingertips into your palms.

The problem with antibacterial soaps and gels is that in terms of COVID-19 they are not more helpful than regular soap and are useless as gels unless they include at least 60% alcohol, because the antibacterial products do not affect viruses at all. Further-more, whatever bacteria do survive such treatment, they can evolve to become resistant to the antibacterial products in the future. Why take the chance of making bacteria stronger when all you need is a little soap and water?

 

Yuri Tomashevi

11 Days Ago

https://sites.nationalacademies.org/BasedOnScience/does-hand-sanitizer-kill-the-coronavirus/index.htm

Hand sanitizer should destroy the novel coronavirus.
Hand sanitizer destroys viruses that are similar to the novel coronavirus, so experts believe it will work against the novel coronavirus, too.

Hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol works best. Look for labels with at least 60% ethanol or 70% isopropanol.
Cover all surfaces of both hands with the sanitizer. Read the package to be sure you’re using the right amount.
Store and use hand sanitizer carefully, especially around children. Swallowing hand sanitizer can cause alcohol poisoning. Sanitizer also can catch on fire.
Be sure the hand sanitizer is not on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's list of hand sanitizers that should not be used. These hand sanitizers have been found to contain toxic ingredients.

If you’re near a sink, wash with soap and water instead.
Scrubbing with soap for 20 seconds and rinsing well is the best way to get the novel coronavirus—and other germs—off your hands.

Washing with soap and water kills more types of germs than using hand sanitizer.
Hand sanitizer works less well against germs when your hands are dirty or greasy. Washing with soap and water works better if your hands are dirty or greasy.

 

Yuri Tomashevi

11 Days Ago

I typically use gloves while in store. Then I throw them away. Only after that I touch my car. Then, in a car, I use hand sanitizer. Later, at home, I use soap.

 

Edward Fielding

11 Days Ago

Thanks Yuri!

The point of the post was to warn about bad batches of hand sanitizer. If you never leave the house, yeah, use soap and water.

I bought some at BJs and then saw it listen on the CDCs site and then received a recall notice from BJs. Luckily the lot numbers of the stuff I bought weren't the ones recalled.

 

Abbie Shores

11 Days Ago

I won't use sanitisers. I use soap and water which our scientists say is good.

I wash hands regularly, even if I visit our garden, as we share a lobby.

But always soap and water.

Doing it properly is as good as sanitising. So even wash under my watch and ring everyone also.

But for people who do use it, thank you for warning them. Much appreciated

 

Bradford Martin

10 Days Ago

I do meal deliveries for 3 years now, although not as much now. I have always used sanitizer and had a pretty good stock of GermX when the virus hot. I also use Purell. I sanitize at least one a delivery, mostly because f touching door handles in busy restaurants where you don't know if the person before you just sneezed on a hand.

I probably have 5 different brads now. If I can get a good stock pf Purell I will throw the rest out , even though they all say made with ethanol.

One thing I found is that too much glycerin will make it sticky and if you add a little water your hands can become too slippery to grip anything This happened to me when I stepped out of my car on a rainy day and lost grip of my phone. I could barely pick it up when I dripped it then dropped it a few more times just trying to get it in my pocket. That was an expensive repair and I avoid any sanitizer with glycerin. Aloe is fine.
You don't need moisturizers in your hand sanitizer. Just keep a tube of hand moisturizer handy. You will need it if you sanitize often. I carry soap and water too but that is not really practical for a delivery driver in and out of different restaurants.

I rarely get colds and never the flu. It's good people are finally learning how to avoid viruses. I will never stop using masks when I feel I need to. BTW I use a KN95 mask. Because if you are going to wear one, you may as well wear one that protects you.

BTW soap and water is far better than hand sanitizer. But you can use sanitizer anywhere.

 

Post Reply

Please login before posting a reply to this message.   If you do not have an account on Fine Art America, click here to create one!

Username

Password