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Simon Brough

9 Days Ago

An Important Deal?

Just started uploading today on FAA, someone has an 'important deal' for me, via site email - sounds suspicious! Before I go down this rabbit hole - should I reply, or is this a recognised tactic to pounce on newcomers!?

The member in question has no bio, images or followers.

Thanks!

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Not just newcomers. There are SPAM and scam emails everywhere these days. It is sad but, yes, be wary of anything that seems even the least bit suspicious.

That "important deal" with no reference to a particular work of art or a specific question - is a dead giveaway - to avoid and delete.

BTW, welcome aboard. Your sphere and wireframe abstracts are intriguing.


~ Bill
---------------
~ www.BillSwartwout.com

 

Simon Brough

9 Days Ago

Good call, Bill - makes sense.

Thanks.

 

Mike Savad

9 Days Ago

i doubt its real, but what was the message?


----Mike Savad
http://www.MikeSavad.com

 

Simon Brough

7 Days Ago

Message read "Good day, I need to have a private discussion with you, please write me through Email: ([omitted]@gmail.com) I have an important deal....."

Strangely, the sender of the email now has the word "SCAMMER" in their email address on FAA! Not sure if this is admin getting on top of things.

Also received another today -

Subject: "Hi"
Message: "My name is Nelly, seen your profile today, I felt special to contact you for an important dealing. kindly get back to me via email ..([omitted]@gmail.com)"

Grammar is an obvious indicator here!

 

Ignore anything that comes from someone with no bio, images or followers as it is most likely spam.

 

Gill Billington

7 Days Ago

This is an art site. If the email contains no detail about any of my specific images and what information they are seeking, I immediately delete it.

 

Ronald Walker

7 Days Ago

Got the same thing a couple of days ago, I just ignore them.

 

Love it: "Grammar is an obvious indicator here!"

Yup - poor grammar (misspelling, incorrect punctuation, lack of proper capitalization, etc) instantly destroys credibility.

 

Mike Savad

7 Days Ago

not always. not everyone has perfect lexiconic abilities. i look at the content, not how its spelled etc. like when i type with a phone, the spelling may be off, dots are in the wrong places because its too close to the keyboard etc.


----Mike Savad
http://www.MikeSavad.com

 

Doug Swanson

7 Days Ago

Be aware that scammers can fake a domain or sender in the link they want you to click on. If you actually thought that you were interested, and it looked like a real link, you should type in the link in your browser window and not click on the one in the e mail, but, in general weird wording, misspellings and "too good to be true" are nearly always dead giveaways. They're right in there with those e mails that say that there's a new Toyota that nobody picked up, so you can have it, or $500 or a hot date or a great job or your chance to pick up some unclaimed freight for $10.

 

Simon Brough

6 Days Ago

Thanks for the input everyone. General consensus is to ignore!

I'll close this up.

 

This discussion is closed.