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Remrov

5 Days Ago

How To Ship 3 X 6 Feet Drawing

Hey everyone,
Not long ago I finished a huge 3 x 6 feet big charcoal drawing of a lion. I did it on paper, and while working on it I had it mounted on a wall. I want to sell the drawing now, and I'm wondering if you have any advice on how to ship it. Framing a drawing before selling is something I actually never do, because it makes it more vulnerable and more expensive to ship as well, and for a piece this big would just be something I can't even afford, and make it huge and vulnerable to ship. This big drawing is a photorealistic drawing that took me 6 months to make, so I have to charge a lot of money for it. Normally I ship larger drawings rolled up in a tube (this is the first time I make a drawing this big though), but I'm not sure if it would look professional enough to ship a drawing of this price ($7000), in a tube. Although it will be the safest way I think. Do you have any advice? And also, what advice can I give a customer about framing such a large piece? Thank you very much.

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David King Studio

5 Days Ago

If it was me I'd use the insulation board sandwich method. Cut two pieces of 1" or thicker insulation board a little bigger than the drawing. Lay a piece of plastic over the drawing to protect it, sandwich it between the two pieces of insulation board and tape it together. Now wrap the whole thing in cardboard. I'm afraid something that big might have to be shipped via truck however.

 

Kim Shuckhart Gunns

5 Days Ago

make sure your drawing is protected via fixative for that media- ship in tube (image rolled to inside & protect from any water damage with a poly bag) ship with full insurance. Any good framer will know how to frame drawings under glass.

 

Donna Mibus

5 Days Ago

People expect paper prints, or paper drawings, of this size to be shipped in tubes. I do not think it will look unprofessional at all. I would recommend you buy the Heavy Duty tubes though. They are sturdier than regular shipping tubes. I don't ship that large, but I ship my 16" X 48" giclee prints in shipping tubes, no problem. I lay it face down on tissue paper and I use another smaller diameter shipping tube that I lay down on it to help me carefully roll it. With smaller sizes I slip the print into those Clear Sleeves. But they only make them so large. So for my large 16 X 48 prints I roll first in the tissue paper. Then I roll that in plastic before slipping it into the tube.
PS, you do not need to roll it up using a smaller diameter shipping tube, but it surely helps. I just have to remind myself to slip that smaller tube out and not mail it along with the print! lol

I think your drawings are SO well done!

 

Thomas Woolworth

5 Days Ago

Ship it in a tube and give the buyer a flat $ amount towards framing...

 

Remrov

5 Days Ago

Thank you all very much for your advice. A high quality heavy duty tube it is then. I did fixate it right after finishing it (it took 3 cans of fixative). I'll also put some plastic around it before putting it in the tube to protect against water.

 

Drew

4 Days Ago

Remrov, congratulations on the sale and I agree with the large tube keeping the coil as loose as possible.
Don't forget to buy insurance equal to the sale price in case it is damaged during shipping.

 

Edward Fielding

4 Days Ago

If you don't roll it:

Common Carrier on a pallet. They can ship a 300-pound pinball machines for about $300-$400 anywhere in the US.

They can ship from one freight terminal to another or door to door.

One option is https://www.servicetransport.com/

 

Remrov

4 Days Ago

Drew - I haven't sold it yet, I wish 😊

I'll definitely be rolling it up in a tube.

 

MM Anderson

4 Days Ago

Good luck with the sale of your work! I have to say that if I were to pay that much for a drawing then I would expect for it to come framed archivally at least in a basic frame of some sort, packed professionally and shipped freight, not rolled in a tube. $7000 is a pretty good chunk of change to be paying for artwork unless done by a moderately well known artist, in my opinion and if shipping is high for you then add that into your total asking price. If you think you can get $7000 then why not go for $7500 and that will offset framing and shipping charges.

 

Edward Fielding

4 Days Ago

Good advice MM! Art prices are plucked from the air. Why not include shipping and price accordingly?

 

Alfred Ng

4 Days Ago

if I paid $7,000 for a drawing I don't expect it comes in a tube. Years ago, I worked in an art gallery we sold a painting for $10,000 the owner framed it free of charge, he and I delivered the painting to the client's home.

 

Remrov

4 Days Ago

I never pluck my art prices just from the air. I consider the time spent on it as well as materials and the size. And it's not that I would find the shipping costs too expensive. If I buyer would like to buy it framed, then I could have that done and ship it accordingly as well. There is no way I have the funds to frame it before I find a buyer. And I have no idea how to practically even go about framing my 3 x 6 feet drawing. Without a car or drivers licence, I guess I would have to find a framer who could frame such a large piece, and go there and back with a taxi or something. I'm autistic and find practical things very difficult to arrange. Also if I do get it framed when I find a buyer, how do I ship it, where do I get shipping materials to ship such a heavy and fragile drawing (with the glass of the frame) in a safe way? Could I just take it to the UPS and could they put it in a crate or something for me? These are all practical things I have no idea how to do at all.

Any advice would help.

 

Steven Ralser

4 Days Ago

The best tubes I have found are those that carpet is rolled on - extra thick and about 5” inside diameter. I got my lost one for free from Home Depot - although any carpet store may give you one.

 

Adam Jewell

4 Days Ago

I think once you get into the $5,000 and up range for a piece or art, the buyer is not really price sensitive and probably isn't going to balk at paying $400.00 or whatever for shipping. It's one reason I put a pretty hefty markup for large prints on FAA. If it is going to cost $350.00 or whatever it costs to ship a 40x60 or larger canvas, metal or whatever, then the buyer better think its a pretty amazing and high quality canvas print.

$350.00 to ship a canvas that costs $700.00 is pretty expensive. $350 to ship a canvas that costs $1,200 doesn't seem as expensive.

$350 to ship a framed drawing that costs $7,500 or $8,000 isn't much in the grand scheme of things.

A frame shop could probably give you a quote for framing and shipping a large piece or artwork like that if you call them.

 

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