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Yuri Tomashevi

7 Days Ago

Upcoming Revolution In Cameras

FYI

Scientists from the University of Ottawa proposed a new optical element that could turn their "ideas into reality by dramatically miniaturizing optical devices, potentially impacting many of the applications in our lives." (https://phys.org/news/2021-06-goodbye-camera-miniaturized-optics-counterpart.html).
They proved the concept experimentally. It is far from being a practical device. But this is just the first paper. I envision an explosion of work by leading scientists and companies doing cameras and cell phones. Watch out for new designs for ordinary and Pro cameras and mobile phones!

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Yuri Tomashevi

7 Days Ago

The original article is here (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-021-23358-8).

 

Chuck De La Rosa

7 Days Ago

It will be interesting to see who comes up with the first practical application. More important, how long will it be before small sensor technology catches up to the point of being able to handle all that data to the point of clarity of standard lenses & sensors?

 

Doug Swanson

7 Days Ago

It's interesting but kind of academic since most photogs don't really fully exploit the possibilities of what they have. In addition, it's generally something else about an image that makes it desirable....content, angle, light and editing. You can imagine a gigapixel image with a huge dynamic range, but could you actually print or display it? If you could, so what. If it goes beyond the ability to human eyes to see the improvement, is it really an improvement?

About 1/3 of what I've sold came from my phone, not even a new one at that. It's in my pocket now, ready to be used. Until somebody comes up with a better idea for content, it seems like the real world can only use so much technology aimed at an image.

 

Bill Swartwout

7 Days Ago

Agreed, Doug. It takes a lot more than quality equipment to produce a great photograph.

 

Edward Fielding

7 Days Ago

All of those cameras out there, yet so many boring photographs.

 

Yuri Tomashevi

7 Days Ago

If your Pro camera will have half the size and half the weight with better quality - that would make a difference in how often and where we would use them.

 

Doug Swanson

7 Days Ago

I've rarely felt that it was either the size or weight that made the difference. If I have my "big" camera, I use it, otherwise, sometimes my phone is there, so I use that. I'm open to the possibility of a small, super-pixel camera, but I don't think it's what makes an image work, since the ability to reproduce or perceive images does reach a limit.

 

Douglas Brown

7 Days Ago

Half the size, half the weight and better quality will/could be better, but also for spying, surveillance, watching etc.

I can see a benefit to photographers, but probably more of a benefit to all things big brother.

I can imagine these devices being placed discreetly around towns and cities, watching and snapping our every move.

 

Mike Savad

7 Days Ago

sounds neat on paper, but they have to make a physical object before i'm impressed.

i remember reading about a new radical idea, a dvd that could hold like terabytes of data. they would take one disk and place like a 100 layers of dye on it. and the player would read and write through all the layers. they built it. but it failed after the above lights ate away at those layers making the disk useless.

so in terms of this, i need them to build it and then i'll see.

but if it works, i would love to have a great camera in a phone, or make the SLR lighter. better zooms etc. the sizes of the images though makes me wonder how big they would be.


----Mike Savad
http://www.MikeSavad.com

 

Rick Berk

7 Days Ago

I saw this kind of thing- the excitement over where photography is going- when Lytro introduced their technology. I worked with them for a year.

Anyone want to guess where they are now? So excuse me if I’m not all a bundle of excitement over a first paper. Lytro showed it’s a long way from the first paper to changing an entire industry.

 

Yuri Tomashevi

6 Days Ago

Severe limitations of Lytro technology were clear from the very beginning. They tried to REPLACE existing optical elements in cameras.

The new technology from Canada is different. They are trying to COMPRESS the empty space between lenses, between lenses and sensors, etc. To achieve that, scientists are ADDING new optical elements between lenses, between lenses and sensors, etc. Current lenses and sensors are staying (for now). The idea itself is brilliant.

Of course, we should wait and see.

 

Mike Savad

6 Days Ago

if this was coupled by the 180 lens

https://360rumors.com/mit-flat-fisheye-lens-metalens/

that would be interesting.



the downside to covering the entire back surface of a phone with a camera is where you put your hands. but spy equipment would really be changed. then it really becomes the Trueman show.


----Mike Savad
http://www.MikeSavad.com

 

Floyd Snyder

6 Days Ago

What we really need is a camera that does not turn into a lazy turd as my newest one has. And it has corrupted all the older ones as well.

For some reason it just sits there in the back seat of my car, refusing to get off its lazy butt and go out there and take pictures. The only place it wants to go is to the golf course these days...

Is there any mention of solving this problem in that paper?

 

Douglas Brown

6 Days Ago

Just read this, definitely the future and i wonder who the smartphone company is that is in on this technology.

https://www.wired.com/story/metalenz-smartphone-lens/

 

Doug Swanson

5 Days Ago

"What we really need is a camera that does not turn into a lazy turd as my newest one has. "

Mine is so lazy that it persistently refuses to tell me where to point it.

Truthfully, I think some of our terrific digital gadgets have gotten to the point where real world consequence of their performance numbers have exceeded the ability of humans to perceive the difference. When the image is better than the eye can see or that the printer can print, what difference does it make whether it has a billion pixels or a trillion pixels? I have no doubt that some phone maker will produce a camera that's better than the best Hassalblad, but, so what?

 

Rick Berk

5 Days Ago

If you say so, Yuri. I'll wait and see. Until there's a product for it, and it's not just a thought on paper, I'm not getting too excited. Lytro was a company that had a product and still failed to do what everyone was claiming they would.

 

Yuri Tomashevi

5 Days Ago

I worked in physics, specifically in optics, for many years. For me, it is an exciting new idea in one particular area, where there were no new ideas for hundreds of years. I will follow the development to see how and when it will turn to practice.

 

Jeff Folger

5 Days Ago

And let's say they do make this development a reality.
Let's say the new Samsung phone comes out (or Apple) and now these SLR killers are in the hands of everyone.
The average person can pinch or expand their phone screen and zoom in and there is no to little Pixelation like there is now..

Let that sink in...

I will be in line for it as well and if you thought selling your are got hard wait for that leap forward.
The only thing making a photographer like us better is our experience and the will to get up at ungodly hours to be their at dawn...
Darn it, I liked sleeping in and Floyd won't be getting as much time on the green. 😀

So be careful what you wish for, it might happen.

 

Drew

16 Hours Ago

Yuri, a potential application for this camera technology would be to create a cloaking panel whereas cameras and screens are interlaced.

 

Ram Vasudev

15 Hours Ago

I agree with Edward Fielding above. So many nice cameras out there - but so many boring pictures!

 

David Bridburg

8 Hours Ago

I do not know what lazy camera syndrome is because I have never used a camera.

I think that is some sort of Scandinavian disease? Not to be confused with Covid.

Dave Bridburg
Bridburg.com
Post Modern Gallery

 

Yuri Tomashevi

6 Hours Ago

We are talking here about cameras just because it is an FAA site. Possible areas of new technology applications are much broader. They include microscopes, telescopes, periscopes, spy equipment, and other devices with optical components. I'm not sure about an expansion outside a visible part of the spectrum, but that is also possible.

 

Robert Potts

6 Hours Ago

Ho-hum... Better IBIS is where it's at!

 

Drew

1 Hour Ago

Sure it is Yuri! Human eyesight is limited.
The color spectrum perception marks the upper and lower range of human electro-magnetic detection limitations.

Photographic technology opens up this limitation and has been allowing the invisible to become visible for longer than a century.

Photographic technology is the one technological advancement that has had the greatest impact on "Modern Art Philosophy " and "The Great Western Art Schism. "

Have a great day FAA!

 

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