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Jane Lou Bandivas

3 Days Ago

Can Someone Feature My Work Here?

Please visit my profile here, I'm new to this page. I want to know how long will you make a sale.

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Douglas Brown

3 Days Ago

Do not focus on sales at this point, focus on quantity of images uploaded and with a good description and plenty of relevant keywords. Good luck.

 

AWAY - Abbie Shores

3 Days Ago

Never add hashtags to tags

I've sorted yours for now

Never add the word 'art' to your tags. I've removed that.

 

Mike Savad

3 Days Ago

Featuring happens in groups if you are in one and on the front page is you are one of the chosen. Neither really help sales. You have to advertise yourself. You only have 1 artwork and its badly tilted. And you have very few keywords. You need at least 10 images to be in the search as far as I know. Everyone's first sale is different, it took me 2 weeks, but I also had 1200 images with an established style. When I started colorizing I had at least 100 of them for people to go through.

If you are here to get rich quick, you won't. Change the bio. Don't tell people you are a beginner, its never a show off point, like why should I buy from a beginner? Don't mention sale either. Tell people what you shoot and what you have. But for now focus on quality and quantity, you really won't make a strong bite unless you have like 200 things, because people won't just buy any old thing.

Marketing 101 by Mike Savad
Why Your Work May Not Be Selling - By Mike Savad
Evaluating Your Own Work To Sell – By Mike Savad
How To Critique And Edit Your Own Work For Better Sales
The importance of Descriptions and Keywords by Mike Savad


----Mike Savad

 

Edward Fielding

3 Days Ago

How long to make a sale? Sometime between now and never.

Depends on the quality of your work, the choices people have among your competition, your ability to market your work, pricing, how many images you have, market demand...

 

Val Arie

3 Days Ago

Welcome Jane!

Not much I can add except to say that if you want to create and sell art you need to be in it for the long haul. As Mike said this is not a way to get rich quick.

Think about creating art that people might want to hang on their walls. Do it because you enjoy it and while you are doing that keep at your day job. I have been here for a while (years) and still only get random sales. (I am not good at marketing or advertizing which is as important as the art you create.)

I think I read that for your art to be searchable you need to have uploaded 10 works.

 

Ron Frazier

2 Days Ago

@Jane Lou Bandivas I say welcome too. I am a newbie here myself. Everything can seem overwhelming. You can learn a lot here on the forum over time.

The reflections in your picture are interesting. As Mike said, you might try straightening the image in an editor. You'll probably have to crop it a bit after straightening it to make it an upright rectangle again. Always save your original camera image. Crop the minimum necessary.

To the others in the group, I'm assuming you don't want to keep editing a JPG image. So, would one use the RAW image to edit from if available, or save the JPG from the camera as PNG or DNG, edit, then go back to JPG to upload?

Upload the biggest image you can without upsizing it.

Here is a thread where we've been discussing inexpensive Photo editors. I ended up getting Affinity Photo but there are many others. Now I just have to learn it.

https://fineartamerica.com/showmessages.php?messageid=6770841

In one of the threads recently, @Abbie Shores I believe posted a link about the importance of editing the image meta data. I don't remember which thread.

I didn't know we had to have 10 pieces to even be in the search system. Is that actually true?

@Mike Savad what you said was informative ... and discouraging. But, at least we know where we stand.

Ron

 

Mike Savad

2 Days Ago

You can't convert a jpg back into a DNG as far as I know. You can rework the same jpg if you want, try not to save it over and over, especially lowering the compression each time because that kills data. If its a simple crop and adjust then you can save it again. If its a major rework, then it might be best to start over. Switching to one format over another makes no sense because when you are photoshop for example, if you have a second layer, unless it starts as a tif, it will save as a PSD format which doesn't compress either.

Over the years the system has been trying to keep only serious people. Usually brand new people don't sell right off the bat, they practice their craft over years before attempting to sell. While that might not be the reason, you need 10 images to be in the search (unless they changed it). And you have to have an avatar.

While discouraging, it is partly true. While its possible to make sales with single image, its nearly impossible to have a few universal images that will sell to people. You need a large selection. Its no different than any other store you walk into. How long would you stay in a store if it only have 2 dozen items? Not long. If they had 200 or a 1000 items? You would stay longer to see if they had the thing you like.

I didn't really start selling colorized images until I had around 100 of them. The style was evening out and people like different things. If you are a very good salesman or happen to get lucky then having a small amount is fine. But overall it takes a lot of time and participation.


----Mike Savad

 

AWAY - Abbie Shores

2 Days Ago

You need 10 images to be in the search but no, you don't need a big selection of images to be a good seller.

Some sellers only have 20 and sell more than some people here.

It's not the amount of images

It's quality and marketing

 

Ron Frazier

1 Day Ago

Abbie, Mike, thanks for the info. I think it would be a good idea to disclose on the image submission form that items will not enter the search engine until there are 10 submissions. I never in my wildest dreams would have imagined that. I thought my one image would at least be SOMEWHERE in the system.

Mike, I was thinking this in terms of workflow. I'm not familiar with Photoshop. As mentioned in another thread, I will eventually be using Affinity Photo.

But, say the JPG from the camera is the only source file as an example. If you have RAW, that could be your primary source. But my theory is that you always want to maintain that source in pristine condition. So, it seems to me that, as soon as you edit it, you should save THAT in a lossless format, so you can edit it again if you need to. But, always keeping that original JPG or RAW in its virgin state. Then, you could export the edited version to whatever final form, like JPG, that's needed. So, you'd have original image, lossless edit copy, final export copy. Since the intermediate edit copy needs to be lossless, so you can keep editing it, I figured you could use PNG or DNG.

Ron

 

Mike Savad

1 Day Ago

I would save it as a tiff file if you don't have some kind of format the program has. Tiff's are pretty universal, have 16bits, I think they can have layers as well. You don't want to save things as a JPG over and over again. A few times, sure, but every time you save it, it compresses a bit more and you lose more file. Its sort of like folding a map, you don't, they are impossible to fold again. And each time you try you lose some of the original creases, then you find out its actually inverse and upside down. And every time you refold it you make it worse and worse, until its just toilet paper in the end.

The raw can't really be edited anyway. There is no save function, it can only have the internal thumbnail updated if basic changes were made.

Jpg isn't lossless, though its kind of close at the highest setting.


My process:

take picture, sort the pictures into: Save these - and convert those.

Convert the files from RAW to DNG. Erase the old raws, move the DNG to an edit folder.

Open the file and adjust the settings, then save it as a PSD, keep doing that till the end, then save as a JPG. I will keep the psd if its a digital art or colorized. You could save it as a PNG, but I still think tiff is better for archival use.


----Mike Savad

 

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