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Ronald Walker

15 Days Ago

What Will Survive?

Will any of your work be around in a hundred years? Two hundred? Do you care?

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David King Studio

15 Days Ago

I doubt it and I don't care.

 

Andrew Pacheco

15 Days Ago

I really don't care if my work is around that far in the future.

One thing worth considering as artists who share our work on the internet, is the possibility that things could be archived and preserved without our knowledge. I think there are some groups that take snapshots of things on the web and archive them, so who knows? As long as zeros and ones are a thing maybe our work could be around indefinitely.

Interesting thought.

 

Ronald Walker

15 Days Ago

I will jump in and say I paint with longevity of the work being considered. Will it survive? I have no idea but I hope so. Here is why, I don’t paint for people in the past, they will never see it. Therefore my paintings are for people of our times but also I am interested in communicating to future generations what our times were like.

 

Andrew Pacheco

15 Days Ago

Ronald, as strange as our times seem to be these days...future people may think our times were much more surreal than they really are after a look at your work. Keep 'em guessing! Hahaha

 

Janice Drew

15 Days Ago

I think anything published will be around in the future. Two of my photographs will be published in the Mayflower Quarterly. Those records will always be preserved in their library.

 

David Bridburg

15 Days Ago

Ron,

The question is will people in the future want to study any of this art?

Our impending dotages will be interesting. Because it may offer a chance over time to see if the public of the future picks up on any of this work.

 

Bill Tomsa

15 Days Ago

When I get my crystal ball back from the shop, I’ll let you know.

 

David King Studio

15 Days Ago

"I will jump in and say I paint with longevity of the work being considered."

Well, I do draw and paint with archival materials, I just doubt anybody will care enough to preserve my work for a hundred+ years, but people care about that when they buy it thinking they'll pass it down I guess, but I think little of my work will escape the trash bin after I'm gone.

 

Mike Savad

15 Days Ago

If i'm dead, it doesn't matter. If i'm alive in 200 years, something weird happened. If my work is donated to the public, it will still be around, protected by a mile of water over the building. My stuff could be around some place, but it doesn't matter. As long as I get paid now.

Right now I forget the last thing I made when I go onto the next thing. I have to jog my memory for older works. That's how little I pay attention to stuff like that.


----Mike Savad

 

Radu Dumitrache

15 Days Ago

Leaving this mark here, and returning in 200 years.
See you all soon!

 

David King Studio

15 Days Ago

A thought just occurred to me. I have some original art by some fairly well known artists, in fact a couple of the pieces I own have been published in magazines, one of them twice that I know of. Will those artists be known in 20-30 years? Maybe, but when I go who will know what to do with that art I leave behind? My guess is it will end up in Goodwill, or antique shops or even the trash even though the artists are published, well known and some even sell in high end galleries. Hardly anybody knows who I am, so why would I think my art would survive?

Bottom line, the only chance most art has of surviving is if it gets picked up by a museum, so you have to be a member of that lofty crowd if you want to leave a lasting legacy after you're gone.

 

Ronald Walker

15 Days Ago

Andrew, just got a chance to return to the site and read your comment, started to laugh , made my night!

 

Brian Wallace

15 Days Ago

I try not to think about it too much. The thought keeps entering my mind however that without the results of my efforts at leaving some kind of legacy, then I will not be remembered in spite of the time I've invested. I suppose it won't really matter in the end anyway. I believe for the most part, our individual lives and their meaning are but a speck compared to the larger picture of the world. The best we can do is try and make some sort of positive difference. Maybe a united effort will allow the rest to last one more day.

Superman, where are you now?

 

Floyd Snyder

15 Days Ago

I hope it is. I plan on leaving it to a not profit in hopes it will fund ongoing scholarships.

Years ago I was on a nonprofit board and we set up a trust to fund scholarships. We (they, I am no longer on the board) have given thousands and thousands of scholarships for kids to go to school and study the arts.

 

Ronald Walker

15 Days Ago

That is pretty cool Floyd!

 

Andrew Pacheco

15 Days Ago

Ronald, I'm glad you got a chuckle...but the poor future people. Ha!

One of my favorite things about Huxley's "Brave New World" novel, was how the future society was somehow based on Henry Ford's idea of production lines and manufacturing. Ever since reading that as a teen, it always makes me think, "what if?"

I suppose the point was more to question what we base our ideas of the past that shape our now, rather than think about what future people may erroneously use as a building block.

 

Val Arie

15 Days Ago

It is a nice thought but let's see - I have been here almost ten years and have very few views so, if I don't get better at adverizing and marketing I doubt my work will be around in another 10.

Almost forgot - nope - don't think I will care. Maybe the opposite - in 100 years instead of caring we might think WHY - why did we spend so much time with this? LOL

Ron - Seriously I believe your work should and will survive. I would be pleased to be around to see that!

 

Roy Erickson

15 Days Ago

Probably not. Works on paper usually do not survive unless they are in museums or 'prominent family' private collections. A few of my abstract works have been printed in metal they might survive if not sent to the recycle bin. I will not care - I will not be here - and most certainly I do not ponder or worry about it.


https://pixels.com/profiles/1-roy-erickson?tab=artwork

 

Phyllis Beiser

14 Days Ago

I hope so. I have hundreds of original paintings floating around in collectors homes. After I am gone, my hopes are that my two sons will be able to make a good living off of my art images. I have just recently made them copies of all of my art images. I will just keep the new ones going to them when I have enough to put on a disc.

 

Douglas Brown

14 Days Ago

I plan to hand over to whoever in the family wants to take it on, i have 5 kids, couple of grandkids, tons of Nephews and Nieces so i am on the look out within my family to see if there is one within who will take this on.

The chances are that in 200 years my bloodline will exist so hopefully (NOT) a great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great relative of mine will discover something about me and may even come across my digital works.

By then though Art will have moved on and every piece of art will be created in a new way that goes beyond our powers of imagination.

 

Abbie Shores

14 Days Ago

Lol @Radu Dumitrache. That's the only way we'd know

 

Bill Tomsa

14 Days Ago

Abbie Lol @Radu Dumitrache. That's the only way we'd know

Actually I checked and 200 years from now people look back on the present 21st century as the second "Golden Age of Art". :O)

 

Toby McGuire

14 Days Ago

Don't care. Maybe people will find some images online to see what the world looked like in the ol' days.

 

REVAD CODEDIMAGES

14 Days Ago

When my atoms have been recycled, there will not be an I to care one way or the other.

Everything is transient.

R E V A D
PIXELS.REVAD.COM
C O D E D I M A G E S

 

Michael Geraghty

14 Days Ago

Because reincarnation is a fact being as there are 3 billion base pairs or permutations of the genome and 7 billion people we are all reincarnated genetically multiple times in our lifetime as well as our sequences recurring throughout the existence of our species, so it would be nice to come back and view our own work and maybe even tidy some up at some time in the future. Make sure to leave your paintings to yourself in your will for the next time around as you will have departed this timeframe and as we all know our work will probably be worth more after we depart.

 

Bill Tomsa

14 Days Ago

M. Geraghty "Make sure to leave your paintings to yourself in your will for the next time around as you will have departed this timeframe and as we all know our work will probably be worth more after we depart.".


WOW! We're going to be RICH!!

 

Michael Geraghty

14 Days Ago

If Van Gogh had done this he could have bought himself a dozen brand new lives and a new ear.

 

Bill Tomsa

14 Days Ago

Heck. He could have printed a new ear on a 3D printer.

 

Michael Geraghty

14 Days Ago

The reality is probably some ruthless artificial intelligence entity claiming they are related and selling our artwork in some backstreet cybernetic cafe for the cost of a squirt of oil.

 

David Bridburg

14 Days Ago

Ideas?

No ideas?

Future?

Better not question the future.....no one there can respond.

 

Ed Meredith

14 Days Ago

I like many here I could care less...

However I have for giggles, embedded a few provocative and engaging (I hope) works of mine (2d and 3D) into the walls of two studio lofts and one house/home I have rehabbed and in a couple of newly constructed homes with the permission of the contractor. I have also place some sculpture pieces in a couple of caves. in have3 more to do, I'm thinking doing some underwater works... so who knows... lol

 

Yuri Tomashevi

14 Days Ago

I do care. Some of my work could survive as family memorabilia. Looking at my family now, I'm pretty sure that they and their descendants will care about it.

The bigger question is, will humans still exist 200 hundred years from now. That I don't know, but I'm pessimistic. There would probably be some post-humans in a better position than current humans and the rest in a worse situation than now.

 

Bill Tomsa

14 Days Ago

O.K. Here goes a daydream I've had for years.

Not only do I imagine my art lasting far into the future but, I imagine originals or maybe framed prints decorating the interior walls (bulkheads) of some distant future spaceship traveling deep into space. Possibly to a planet many lightyears away.

It could happen. :o)

 

Kevin Callahan

14 Days Ago

I have (at least) one large work that has been hanging for nearly 50 years. Who knows what the future may bring. Though I pretty much agree with David King, obscurity, thrift shop, garbage. Plus, perhaps a few works that are handed down through the family.

 

Ronald Walker

14 Days Ago

Kevin C, I can see work making it to 100 but 200 would be a big challenge.

 

Michael Hoard

14 Days Ago

Without any question or hesitation, I care my artistic contributions may remain well into the unforseen future traits of an over achiever and Rennanaise Man.

My design, construction and contribution of "Equity Circle" a public meeting space to make new aquantices , renew old or settle indifferences will be remaining long into the future. Scientist claim within 50 years the Gulf of Mexico may well be about 25 miles from the City of New Orleans, LA with global sea levels rising if submerged it will be discovered.

The entire project pathway surrounding "Equity Circle" constructed with pervious materials, the cement benches reinforced steel many feet below the surface accounting for any future subsidence. The city alone may be endengered of water intrusion but the mounment dedicated to the citizens and community will long exist. The projected funded and awarded $50,000.00 by the Winter Institue, Kellog Foundation and city community funding.

The project design and Welcome Table participation members and myself received the prestitious award presented by the past Mayor of the City, Mitch Landieu the first presented to citizens and there outstanding community contributions a bronze medal recipient of The New Orleans Community Excellence Award was the epitomy of my entire artiisc career since age 12. As a artist my legecy shall remain for all to view, read, inspire long into the future

My archival lifelong 59 years of photography collection accepted by a histric collection for preservation by historians.

On November 25, 2021 I turn 70 and preparing for my next life decade 2022 and contributing additional media contirubtions of my one to three month solo voyages and marine explorations aboard my sailboat, christening sometime in mid-summer of 2022 with live GPS tracking, weekly you-tube video. presentations and documented journey's new adventure reinacting documented voyages of ancestors my grandfather unknown journey from Roscrea, Ireland 1913 aboard the S. S. Celtic, Germany, Norway to America and documented coordinates, voyages as my father crossed the equator during World War II and countries he visited.

Regardless of each there own successes or notoritity accept here and now any accolades for the outstanding achievements we all strive by contritubing to the artistic community now and long into the future. as all predisitors have done from primitive to present modern society.

Here is the link to the "Equity Circle" project a public meeting place for the citizens and community of Mid-City considered the heart of New Orleans, LA

https://fineartamerica.com/profiles/eyeseecolors.html?tab=artworkgalleries&artworkgalleryid=807553

It has always been in my belief, "no goal is beyound reach while achieving success" throughout each decade of my existence, a personal micro snapshot connection of decades past, present and unknown future will be preserved by the future historians, what we all have contributed, a documented continuence of present evolution for all future humanity.

 

Tatiana Moskalenko

14 Days Ago

I have been painting not so long ago and I want to say that I do it without looking into the future, I live in the moment, the moment when the passion of painting captures you. I think this is the most important thing.

 

Scorpion Design

14 Days Ago

Will I be around in a hundred years time; I doubt it. Will might art be around in a hundred years time; may be may be not. I understand Janice's point; however, there are examples of thing that have been found (for example early episodes of tv programmes) that were thought lost. The point being that while things might be potential being around they might not be actually around. Where is the best place to hide a book; in a library of course. Want to do the job well; then chose the British library or the library of Congress.
Do I care; one observation only 'time is a great sieve'

 

Scorpion Design

14 Days Ago

I would agree with David (as well as those who said similar). The very fact that some artists care so much about using light fast paints and archival supports suggest that they might care. PS, I am not saying for one moment using such materials it is a bad thing! On the of hand not using such materials is also not a bad thing.

 

Martha Harrell

14 Days Ago

I think it is possible some of mine might survive some decades. Some of my paintings are of landscapes of towns and rivers instate. Also some portraits will possibly survive some decades. Hopefully some people in the future will care about such things.

 

Scorpion Design

14 Days Ago

This came up on the UK news today ''Archaeologists have unearthed the first Roman mosaic of its kind in the UK. Today (Thursday 25th November 2021), a rare Roman mosaic and surrounding villa complex have been protected as a Scheduled Monument by DCMS on the advice of Historic England. The decision follows archaeological work undertaken by a team from University of Leicester Archaeological Services (ULAS), working in partnership with Historic England and in liaison with Rutland County Council.'' So art can survive a very long time. Maybe the trick is to bury it!

 

David King Studio

13 Days Ago

"Maybe the trick is to bury it!"

No, the trick is for it to be rare and historically important. So much contemporary art is being created today I'm pretty sure future archeologists and historians will have no trouble finding plenty of examples...that is unless an asteroid slams into the Earth destroying civilization and most of humanity, then a couple thousand years after the survivors have started to rebuild civilization our art might become archealogically significant. lol

 

Ronald Walker

13 Days Ago

David King, it is also true that future archeologist might not recognize much of today’s art as art. It could be the source of a lot of head scratching.

 

Scorpion Design

13 Days Ago

David King the point I was actually making was that there is a play off between, how assailable art is and its longevity. ''No, the trick is for it to be rare and historically important'' I agree with that; but only if the art work physically survives.
I will give an example, rare manuscripts which include wonderful art survive because they are protect; with pages being turn regularly. there are some quite famous art works that are known about, the we can say little about because they have not physically survived.
You made the point very well with the statement 'Well, I do draw and paint with archival materials' But there are two sides to archival materials, it depend partly on the material and partly on the conditions that the artwork is placed in.

 

J L Meadows

13 Days Ago

*shrug* As long as my art helps ME survive, I don't much care for what happens with it after I'm gone. That's not up to me, anyway...

 

Shana Rowe Jackson

13 Days Ago

I go back and forth with my thoughts on this. I suppose I would like for it to survive in some way, I don't have children so art may be my only legacy.

I try to use archival materials, so that at the very least, if someone spends their hard earned money on my work it doesn't fade out on their walls. So in that way I want it to last as long as possible.

But in the long run I know most things don't last forever. I don't expect to be famous enough to be in a museum where people will restore my work and keep it pristine, so I just try to enjoy my work in the here and now.

 

Scorpion Design

13 Days Ago

Ronald I have been thinking about 'it is also true that future archeologist might not recognize much of today’s art as art.' do you actually believe that. Okay; maybe so in 100,000 years time.
However I would suggest that we are quite capable of recognizing the art of 2000 years ago.
I also do not accept that the art of today is that much different of the art of say 700 years ago. Yes there might be artists of today that push the boundaries; some close to the limit. However; is that not always the case. I can think of an artist born in about 1450 that would push the boundaries for most of us living today. In his case what he was doing makes more sense when you spend time understanding him.

 

Milija Jakic

13 Days Ago

Will be more, or wont be tomorow

 

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